Recipient reactions to aid

Effects of locus of initiation, attributions, and individual differences

Angelica M La Morto-Corse, Charles S Carver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies investigated the experience of obtaining aid. It was hypothesized that attributing need for aid to internal factors would be self-esteem threatening and that under such conditions actively seeking aid would be more aversive than passively accepting aid. No difference in aversiveness was expected when the need was externally attributed. In Experiment 1, subjects sought less aid when need was internally attributed than when it was externally attributed. In Experiment 2, subjects obtained less aid when they had to seek it than when they could passively accept it, and they obtained less aid when need was internally attributed than when it was externally attributed. The expected interaction between these variables emerged only among persons high in dispositional self-consciousness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-268
Number of pages4
JournalBulletin of the Psychonomic Society
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1980

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Recipient reactions to aid : Effects of locus of initiation, attributions, and individual differences. / Morto-Corse, Angelica M La; Carver, Charles S.

In: Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, Vol. 16, No. 4, 1980, p. 265-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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