Reactions toward mental, physical, and substance-abuse disorders

Jennifer A. Kymalainen, Amy G Weisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, participants read 3 separate vignettes describing a hypothetical sibling with each of the following disorders: substance abuse, schizophrenia, and a physical illness. As hypothesized, and consistent with attribution theory, the hypothetical patient with a substance-abuse disorder was perceived as having the most control over his or her illness and the associated symptoms, and the patient described as having a physical illness was perceived as having the least control over his or her illness. Also in support of attribution theory, the hypothetical patient described as having a substance-abuse disorder elicited the most negative emotional reactions from participants, and the patient described as having a physical illness elicited the least negative emotional reactions. Again in support of attribution theory and study hypotheses, participants reported the most willingness to help a physically ill hypothetical sibling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1883-1899
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume34
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

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Substance-Related Disorders
Siblings
Schizophrenia
Physical Abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Reactions toward mental, physical, and substance-abuse disorders. / Kymalainen, Jennifer A.; Weisman, Amy G.

In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 9, 01.09.2004, p. 1883-1899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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