Reach versus effectiveness: The design and protocol of randomized clinical trial testing a smartphone application versus in-person mindfulness-based smoking cessation intervention among young cancer survivors

Taghrid Asfar, Tulay Koru-Sengul, Debra Annane, Laura A. McClure, Amanda Perez, Michael A. Antoni, Judson Brewer, David J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Approximately 45% of young cancer survivors (18–40 years) are cigarette smokers. Continued smoking after cancer diagnosis leads to lower survival rates. A major logistical problem with smoking cessation efforts in this group is their geographic dispersion which makes them hard to reach. In addition, depression is a major predictor of smoking relapse and its rates are roughly twice as high in cancer survivors as the general population. Smartphone applications (apps) show promise in terms of efficacy, dissemination, and improving access to treatment. Mindfulness training (defined as maintaining attention on one's immediate experience and cultivating an attitude of acceptance toward this experience) is effective in improving smoking cessation outcomes by reducing psychological stress and controlling craving. Given that smartphone apps can address the issues of mobility and remote access, and mindfulness can address the high depression rate among cancer survivors, validating the feasibility and efficacy of a mindfulness-based smoking cessation intervention app in young cancer survivors is a high priority. Thus, the aims of the current study are: (1) test the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of the mindfulness-based smoking cessation app versus in-person mindfulness or usual care in a 3-arm pilot randomized clinical trial among young cancer survivors (n = 60; 18–40 years); and 2) conduct semi-structured exit interviews with participants in the two mindfulness groups to fine-tune the two active interventions based on feedback from participants. Findings will have implications for the development and dissemination of innovative and highly scalable tobacco cessation interventions designed for young cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100784
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials Communications
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Randomized clinical trial
  • Smartphone application
  • Smoking cessation intervention
  • Young cancer survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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