Rating scale item assessment of self-harm in postpartum women: a cross-sectional analysis

Jessica L. Coker, Shanti P. Tripathi, Bettina T. Knight, Page B. Pennell, Everett F. Magann, Donald J Newport, Zachary N. Stowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the utility of screening instruments to identify risk factors for suicidal ideation (SI) in a population of women with neuropsychiatric illnesses at high risk for postpartum depression. Pregnant women with neuropsychiatric illness enrolled prior to 20 weeks of gestation. Follow-up visits at 4–8-week intervals through 13 weeks postpartum included assessment of depressive symptoms with both clinician and self-rated scales. A total of 842 women were included in the study. Up to 22.3% of postpartum women admitted SI on rating scales, despite the majority (79%) receiving active pharmacological treatment for psychiatric illness. Postpartum women admitting self-harm/SI were more likely to meet criteria for current major depressive episode (MDE), less than college education, an unplanned pregnancy, a history of past suicide attempt, and a higher score on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. In women with a history of neuropsychiatric illness, over 20% admitted SI during the postpartum period despite ongoing psychiatric treatment. Patient-rated depression scales are more sensitive screening tools than a clinician-rated depression scale for +SI in the postpartum period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 30 2017

Fingerprint

Suicidal Ideation
Postpartum Period
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Psychiatry
Unplanned Pregnancy
Postpartum Depression
Reproductive History
Suicide
Pregnant Women
Pharmacology
Education
Pregnancy
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • Postpartum
  • Risk factors
  • Suicidal ideation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Coker, J. L., Tripathi, S. P., Knight, B. T., Pennell, P. B., Magann, E. F., Newport, D. J., & Stowe, Z. N. (Accepted/In press). Rating scale item assessment of self-harm in postpartum women: a cross-sectional analysis. Archives of Women's Mental Health, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00737-017-0749-2

Rating scale item assessment of self-harm in postpartum women : a cross-sectional analysis. / Coker, Jessica L.; Tripathi, Shanti P.; Knight, Bettina T.; Pennell, Page B.; Magann, Everett F.; Newport, Donald J; Stowe, Zachary N.

In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, 30.06.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coker, Jessica L. ; Tripathi, Shanti P. ; Knight, Bettina T. ; Pennell, Page B. ; Magann, Everett F. ; Newport, Donald J ; Stowe, Zachary N. / Rating scale item assessment of self-harm in postpartum women : a cross-sectional analysis. In: Archives of Women's Mental Health. 2017 ; pp. 1-8.
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