RAPID MEASUREMENT OF MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTIONS USING NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE.

Andrew A Maudsley, Armulf Oppelt, Alexander Ganssen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A method is described, which permits the measurement of magnetic field distributions in two or three dimensions. It is based on a nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the Fourier-Zeugmatography, which was recently developed for two- and three-dimensional spin density imaging. The spatial assignment of the nuclear signal is achieved without any mechanical movement by a sequence of pulsed magnetic field gradients during a series of free induction decays. An example of a two-dimensional field imaging in the gap of a conventional electromagnet is presented. The field distribution was measured with a field resolution of 1. 5 multiplied by (times) 10** minus **6 Tesla, and a spatial resolution of 0. 065 cm in a time of 9. 7 min.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326-331
Number of pages6
JournalSiemens Forschungs- und Entwicklungsberichte/Siemens Research and Development Reports
Volume8
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1979
Externally publishedYes

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Nuclear magnetic resonance
Magnetic fields
Imaging techniques
Electromagnets
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

RAPID MEASUREMENT OF MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTIONS USING NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. / Maudsley, Andrew A; Oppelt, Armulf; Ganssen, Alexander.

In: Siemens Forschungs- und Entwicklungsberichte/Siemens Research and Development Reports, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.12.1979, p. 326-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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