Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral stress management in breast cancer: A brief report of effects on 5-year depressive

Jamie M. Stagl, Michael H Antoni, Suzanne C Lechner, Laura C. Bouchard, Bonnie B Blomberg, Stefan Glück, Robert P. Derhagopian, Charles S Carver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Survivors of breast cancer experience stress and are at risk for depressive symptoms following primary treatment. Group-based interventions such as cognitive- behavioral stress management (CBSM) delivered postsurgery for nonmetastatic breast cancer (BCa) were previously associated with fewer depressive symptoms over a 12-month follow-up; few studies have examined the longer-term benefits of such psychosocial interventions. This 5-year follow-up study of a previously conducted trial (#NCT01422551) tested whether group-based CBSM following surgery for nonmetastatic BCa was associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Methods: Women (N = 240) with Stage 0-IIIb BCa were recruited 2-10 weeks postsurgery and randomized to a 10-week CBSM intervention group or a 1-day psycho-educational control group. Women were recontacted 5 years poststudy enrollment and reconsented to participate in the follow-up study (N = 130). Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). ANOVA and ANCOVA analyses were employed to test for group differences on the CES-D at 5-year follow-up accounting for relevant covariates. Results: Participants assigned to CBSM reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms (M = 9.99, SE = 0.93) at the follow-up compared with those in the control group (M = 12.97, SE = 0.99), p = .030. With covariates, the group difference remained significant, p = .012. Conclusion: Women who received CBSM postsurgery for BCa reported fewer depressive symptoms than those in the control group in this 5-year follow-up. Psychosocial interventions early in treatment may influence long-term psychological well-being in BCa survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-180
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Breast Neoplasms
Control Groups
Survivors
Epidemiologic Studies
Analysis of Variance
Psychology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Breast cancer survivors
  • Cognitive-behavioral stress management
  • Depressive symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral stress management in breast cancer : A brief report of effects on 5-year depressive. / Stagl, Jamie M.; Antoni, Michael H; Lechner, Suzanne C; Bouchard, Laura C.; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Glück, Stefan; Derhagopian, Robert P.; Carver, Charles S.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 2, 2015, p. 176-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stagl, Jamie M. ; Antoni, Michael H ; Lechner, Suzanne C ; Bouchard, Laura C. ; Blomberg, Bonnie B ; Glück, Stefan ; Derhagopian, Robert P. ; Carver, Charles S. / Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral stress management in breast cancer : A brief report of effects on 5-year depressive. In: Health Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 176-180.
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AB - Objective: Survivors of breast cancer experience stress and are at risk for depressive symptoms following primary treatment. Group-based interventions such as cognitive- behavioral stress management (CBSM) delivered postsurgery for nonmetastatic breast cancer (BCa) were previously associated with fewer depressive symptoms over a 12-month follow-up; few studies have examined the longer-term benefits of such psychosocial interventions. This 5-year follow-up study of a previously conducted trial (#NCT01422551) tested whether group-based CBSM following surgery for nonmetastatic BCa was associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Methods: Women (N = 240) with Stage 0-IIIb BCa were recruited 2-10 weeks postsurgery and randomized to a 10-week CBSM intervention group or a 1-day psycho-educational control group. Women were recontacted 5 years poststudy enrollment and reconsented to participate in the follow-up study (N = 130). Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). ANOVA and ANCOVA analyses were employed to test for group differences on the CES-D at 5-year follow-up accounting for relevant covariates. Results: Participants assigned to CBSM reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms (M = 9.99, SE = 0.93) at the follow-up compared with those in the control group (M = 12.97, SE = 0.99), p = .030. With covariates, the group difference remained significant, p = .012. Conclusion: Women who received CBSM postsurgery for BCa reported fewer depressive symptoms than those in the control group in this 5-year follow-up. Psychosocial interventions early in treatment may influence long-term psychological well-being in BCa survivors.

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