Radiosensitivity of human clonogenic myeloma cells and normal bone marrow precursors

Effect of different dose rates and fractionation

Stefan Glück, Jake Van Dyk, Hans A. Messner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Evaluation of radiation dose rate and fractionation effects on clonogenic myeloma cells. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity of clonogenic myeloma cells was evaluated for seven human myeloma cell lines. The lines were maintained in liquid suspension culture. Following radiation, cells were plated in semisolid medium using methylcellulose as viscous support. Radiation doses up to 12 Gy were delivered at dose rates of 0.05 and 0.5 Gy/min by a 60Co source. Each total dose was administered either as a single dose or in multiple fractions of 2 Gy. The data were analyzed according to the linear quadratic and multi target model of irradiation. Results: Clonogenic progenitors of the seven myeloma cell lines differed in their radiosensitivity as measured by multiple parameters. The differences were mainly observed at low dose. The most effective cytoreduction was seen when radiation was administered in a single fraction at high dose rate. The cytoreductive effect on clonogenic myeloma cells was compared for clinically practiced total body irradiation (TBI) schedules delivered either in a single or in multiple fractions without causing significant pulmonary toxicity. The administration of 12 Gy delivered in six fractions of 2 Gy resulted in a superior reduction of clonogenic cells compared to a single fraction of 5 Gy. Conclusion: The preparation of bone marrow transplant recipients with multiple myeloma using fractionated radiation with a total dose of 12 Gy appears to afford better ablation than a single dose of 5 Gy while maintaining a low incidence of pulmonary toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)877-882
Number of pages6
JournalInternational journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dose Fractionation
bone marrow
Radiation Tolerance
radiation tolerance
fractionation
Bone Marrow Cells
Radiation
dosage
cells
radiation
Cell Line
Lung
Methylcellulose
Whole-Body Irradiation
cultured cells
toxicity
Multiple Myeloma
Suspensions
Appointments and Schedules
semisolids

Keywords

  • Clonogenic myeloma progenitors
  • Human myeloma cell lines
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Normal bone marrow radiosensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

Cite this

Radiosensitivity of human clonogenic myeloma cells and normal bone marrow precursors : Effect of different dose rates and fractionation. / Glück, Stefan; Van Dyk, Jake; Messner, Hans A.

In: International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.03.1994, p. 877-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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