Radiofrequency Interstitial Tissue Ablation: Wet Electrode

Raymond J. Leveillee, Michael F. Hoey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Minimally invasive methods for destroying tissue have been investigated for more than a decade, and growing interest has emerged in small probe or needle ablative techniques. Many energy sources that freeze or heat tissue have been studied. This paper discusses radiofrequency (RF) thermal therapy as delivered by the saline-augmented ("wet" or virtual) electrode. The technique modifies the electric field distribution and the resultant heat deposition within tissues by interstitially infusing a highly conductive electrolyte solution during the application of RF energy. We consider the mechanism of action of the saline-augmented probe, with emphasis on tissue electrical impedance, temperature distributions, and how the fluid circumvents the limitations of standard "dry" probes. If optimized for the particular application, the wet electrode can produce small to large ablation volumes quickly and controllably with a single needle stick. Because there is no desiccation or extremely high temperature, the tissue is not subjected to a phase shift of carbonization, which may reduce post-treatment inflammation and improve healing. The liquid RF electrode will find applications in the interstitial treatment of various tissues, including tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)563-577
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume17
Issue number8
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Electrodes
Hot Temperature
Needlestick Injuries
Desiccation
Temperature
Electric Impedance
Electrolytes
Needles
Inflammation
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Leveillee, R. J., & Hoey, M. F. (2003). Radiofrequency Interstitial Tissue Ablation: Wet Electrode. Journal of Endourology, 17(8), 563-577.

Radiofrequency Interstitial Tissue Ablation : Wet Electrode. / Leveillee, Raymond J.; Hoey, Michael F.

In: Journal of Endourology, Vol. 17, No. 8, 01.10.2003, p. 563-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leveillee, RJ & Hoey, MF 2003, 'Radiofrequency Interstitial Tissue Ablation: Wet Electrode', Journal of Endourology, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 563-577.
Leveillee, Raymond J. ; Hoey, Michael F. / Radiofrequency Interstitial Tissue Ablation : Wet Electrode. In: Journal of Endourology. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 563-577.
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