Radar in atmospheric sciences and related research: Current systems, emerging technology, and future needs

Howard B. Bluestein, Robert M. Rauber, Donald W. Burgess, Bruce A Albrecht, Scott M. Ellis, Yvette P. Richardson, David P. Jorgensen, Stephen J. Frasier, Phillip Chilson, Robert D. Palmer, Sandra E. Yuter, Wen Chau Lee, David C. Dowell, Paul L. Smith, Paul M. Markowski, Katja Friedrich, Tammy M. Weckwerth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Emerging radar technologies best suited to addressing key scientific questions and future problems are identified and discussed. Future research with radar will involve multiplatform, multi-model investigations. There will be four major research themes involving radar. To address these scientific problems, radars will be needed on diverse platforms including ships, aircraft, and stationary and mobile ground-based platforms. Some of the latter platforms may be quasi mobile: able to move the radar to a fixed location for an extended period. Radar will be needed to study, for example, tropical cloud systems, oceanic tropical convection and its impact on climate, the effects of aerosols on cloud microphysics, and global and regional orographic precipitation as a source of water supply. Dr. Rauber suggests that during the next two decades global climate change impacts are likely to drive research more and more.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1850-1861
Number of pages12
JournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Volume95
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Bluestein, H. B., Rauber, R. M., Burgess, D. W., Albrecht, B. A., Ellis, S. M., Richardson, Y. P., Jorgensen, D. P., Frasier, S. J., Chilson, P., Palmer, R. D., Yuter, S. E., Lee, W. C., Dowell, D. C., Smith, P. L., Markowski, P. M., Friedrich, K., & Weckwerth, T. M. (2014). Radar in atmospheric sciences and related research: Current systems, emerging technology, and future needs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 95(12), 1850-1861. https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-13-00079.1