Racial-ethnic disparities in acute blood pressure after intracerebral hemorrhage

Sebastian Koch, Mitchell S.V. Elkind, Fernando D. Testai, W. Mark Brown, Sharyl Martini, Kevin N. Sheth, Ji Y. Chong, Jennifer Osborne, Charles J. Moomaw, Carl D. Langefeld, Ralph L. Sacco, Daniel Woo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess race-ethnic differences in acute blood pressure (BP) following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and the contribution to disparities in ICH outcome. Methods: BPs in the field (emergency medical services [EMS]), emergency department (ED), and at 24 hours were compared and adjusted for group differences between non-Hispanic black (black), non-Hispanic white (white), and Hispanic participants in the Ethnic Racial Variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage case-control study. Outcome was obtained by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months. We analyzed race-ethnic differences in good outcome (mRS ≤ 2) and mortality after adjusting for baseline differences and included BP recordings in this model. Results: Of 2,069 ICH cases enrolled, 30% were white, 37% black, and 33% Hispanic. Black and Hispanic patients had higher EMS and ED systolic and diastolic BPs compared with white patients (p 0.0001). Although attenuated, at 24 hours after admission, black patients had higher systolic and diastolic BPs. After adjusting for baseline differences, significant race/ethnic differences persisted for EMS systolic, ED systolic and diastolic, and 24-hours diastolic BP. Only ED systolic and diastolic BP was associated with poor functional outcome, and no BP predicted mortality. We found no race-ethnic differences in 3-month functional outcome or mortality after adjusting for group differences, including acute BPs. Conclusions: Although black and Hispanic patients had higher BPs than white patients at presentation, we did not find race-ethnic disparities in 3-month functional outcome or mortality. ED systolic and diastolic BP was associated with poor functional outcome, but not mortality, in this race-ethnically diverse population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)786-791
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume87
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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