Racial disparities in quality-adjusted life-years associated with diabetes and visual impairment

Kathryn McCollister, D. Diane Zheng, Cristina A. Fernandez, David J Lee, Byron L Lam, Kristopher Arheart, Anat Galor, Manuel Ocasio, Peter Muennig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Compare differences in health-related quality of life among blacks and whites to examine if race, diabetes, and visual impairment (VI) present a triple disadvantage in terms of quality-adjusted life expectancy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Data were analyzed fromthe 2000-2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey that contains the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D). The EQ-5D generates health utility values that provide a measure of the morbidity associated with various health states, such as having moderate or severe problems with mobility. The EQ-5D score can be linked with life expectancy data to calculate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), the number of years of optimal health an individual is expected to live. Multivariate analyses were conducted to estimate and compare differences in QALYs by diabetes status, VI status, and race. RESULTS - Whites had a higher quality-adjusted life expectancy across all diabetes/VI comparisons. Overall, blacks with diabetes and VI had the fewest number of QALYs remaining (19.6 years), and whites with no impairment had the greatest number ofQALYs remaining (31.6 years). Blacks with diabetes only had 1.7 fewer years of optimal health (fewer QALYs) than whites with diabetes. Within individuals with both diabetes and VI, however, this gap more than doubled, with blacks experiencing 3.5 fewer QALYs than whites. CONCLUSIONS - Although efforts to target and reduce racial health disparities associated with diabetes appear to be effective, black communities may be contributing to a greater overall burden of illness given poorer infrastructure and less accommodation for disabilities such as VI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1692-1694
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

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Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Vision Disorders
Life Expectancy
Health
Quality of Life
Cost of Illness
Health Expenditures
Research Design
Multivariate Analysis
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Racial disparities in quality-adjusted life-years associated with diabetes and visual impairment. / McCollister, Kathryn; Zheng, D. Diane; Fernandez, Cristina A.; Lee, David J; Lam, Byron L; Arheart, Kristopher; Galor, Anat; Ocasio, Manuel; Muennig, Peter.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 35, No. 8, 01.08.2012, p. 1692-1694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCollister, Kathryn ; Zheng, D. Diane ; Fernandez, Cristina A. ; Lee, David J ; Lam, Byron L ; Arheart, Kristopher ; Galor, Anat ; Ocasio, Manuel ; Muennig, Peter. / Racial disparities in quality-adjusted life-years associated with diabetes and visual impairment. In: Diabetes Care. 2012 ; Vol. 35, No. 8. pp. 1692-1694.
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