Racial differences in visceral adipose tissue but not anthropometric markers of health-related variables

Arlette Perry, E. Brooks Applegate, M. Loreto Jackson, Steven Deprima, Ronald B Goldberg, Robert Ross, Lani Kempner, Brandon B. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study sought to determine whether visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and/or its anthropometric surrogates could significantly predict health-related variables (HRV) in overweight Caucasian (CC) (n = 36) and African-American (AA) (n = 30) women. With the use of magnetic resonance imaging, findings showed significantly higher volume and area of VAT (P < 0.0001 for both) as well as higher triacylglycerol (P = 0.009) in CC compared with AA women. Furthermore, VAT volume, race, and VAT volume x race interaction could significantly predict triacylglycerol (P = 0.0094), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.0057), insulin (P = 0.0002), and insulin resistance (P < 0.0001). Additionally, the VAT volume x race interaction for insulin (P = 0.040) and insulin resistance (P = 0.003) was significant. In a separate analysis, waist circumference and race predicted the identical variables. Our results support the use of volume or area of VAT in predicting HRV in CC women; however, its use in AA women appears limited. In contrast, waist circumference can provide a suitable VAT alternative for both CC and AA women; however, VAT clearly represents the more powerful predictor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)636-643
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume89
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 31 2000

Fingerprint

Intra-Abdominal Fat
Health
African Americans
Waist Circumference
Insulin Resistance
Triglycerides
Insulin
HDL Cholesterol
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • African-American women
  • Caucasian women
  • Central obesity
  • Glucose
  • Insulin
  • Serum lipoproteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Perry, A., Applegate, E. B., Jackson, M. L., Deprima, S., Goldberg, R. B., Ross, R., ... Feldman, B. B. (2000). Racial differences in visceral adipose tissue but not anthropometric markers of health-related variables. Journal of Applied Physiology, 89(2), 636-643.

Racial differences in visceral adipose tissue but not anthropometric markers of health-related variables. / Perry, Arlette; Applegate, E. Brooks; Jackson, M. Loreto; Deprima, Steven; Goldberg, Ronald B; Ross, Robert; Kempner, Lani; Feldman, Brandon B.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 89, No. 2, 31.08.2000, p. 636-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perry, A, Applegate, EB, Jackson, ML, Deprima, S, Goldberg, RB, Ross, R, Kempner, L & Feldman, BB 2000, 'Racial differences in visceral adipose tissue but not anthropometric markers of health-related variables', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 89, no. 2, pp. 636-643.
Perry, Arlette ; Applegate, E. Brooks ; Jackson, M. Loreto ; Deprima, Steven ; Goldberg, Ronald B ; Ross, Robert ; Kempner, Lani ; Feldman, Brandon B. / Racial differences in visceral adipose tissue but not anthropometric markers of health-related variables. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2000 ; Vol. 89, No. 2. pp. 636-643.
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