Racial Differences Among High-Risk Patients Presenting With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Results from the SYNERGY Trial)†Disclosure: Drs. Mahaffey, Cohen, Newby, Ferguson, and Califf have received honoria for speaking from sanofi-aventis. Drs. Mahaffey, Ferguson, and Califf have acted as consultants for sanofi-aventis. Drs. Echols, Velazquez, Santos.

Melvin R. Echols, Kenneth W. Mahaffey, Anindita Banerjee, Karen S. Pieper, Amanda Stebbins, Alexandra Lansky, Mauricio G Cohen, Eric Velazquez, Renato Santos, L. Kristin Newby, Enrique P. Gurfinkel, Luigi Biasucci, James J. Ferguson, Robert M. Califf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Full title. Racial Differences Among High-Risk Patients Presenting With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Results from the SYNERGY Trial)†Disclosure: Drs. Mahaffey, Cohen, Newby, Ferguson, and Califf have received honoria for speaking from sanofi-aventis. Drs. Mahaffey, Ferguson, and Califf have acted as consultants for sanofi-aventis. Drs. Echols, Velazquez, Santos, and Gurfinkel have no financial relationships to disclose. Management and outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) may vary according to patient race and ethnicity. To assess racial differences in presentation and outcome in high-risk North American patients with non-ST-segment elevation (NSTE) ACS, we analyzed baseline racial/ethnic differences and all-cause death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in 6,077 white, 586 African-American, and 344 Hispanic patients through 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year follow-up. Frequencies of hypertension were 66% for whites, 83% for African-Americans, and 78% for Hispanics (overall p <0.001). Use of angiography was similar across groups. Use of percutaneous coronary intervention (46% for whites, 41% for African-Americans, and 45% for Hispanics, overall p = 0.046) and coronary artery bypass grafting (20% for whites, 16% for African-Americans, and 22% for Hispanics, overall p = 0.044) differed. African-American patients had significantly fewer diseased vessels compared with white patients (p = 0.0001). Thirty-day death or MI was 14% for whites, 10% for African-Americans, and 14% for Hispanics (overall p = 0.034). After adjustment for baseline variables, African-American patients had lower 30-day death or MI compared with white patients (odds ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.55 to 0.98). There were no differences in 6-month death or MI across racial/ethnic groups. In conclusion, baseline clinical characteristics differed across North American racial/ethnic groups in the SYNERGY trial. African-American patients had significantly better adjusted 30-day outcomes but similar 6-month outcomes compared with white patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-321
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume99
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Disclosure
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Consultants
African Americans
Hispanic Americans
Myocardial Infarction
Ethnic Groups
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Coronary Artery Bypass
Cause of Death
Angiography
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Racial Differences Among High-Risk Patients Presenting With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Results from the SYNERGY Trial)†Disclosure : Drs. Mahaffey, Cohen, Newby, Ferguson, and Califf have received honoria for speaking from sanofi-aventis. Drs. Mahaffey, Ferguson, and Califf have acted as consultants for sanofi-aventis. Drs. Echols, Velazquez, Santos. / Echols, Melvin R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Banerjee, Anindita; Pieper, Karen S.; Stebbins, Amanda; Lansky, Alexandra; Cohen, Mauricio G; Velazquez, Eric; Santos, Renato; Newby, L. Kristin; Gurfinkel, Enrique P.; Biasucci, Luigi; Ferguson, James J.; Califf, Robert M.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 99, No. 3, 01.02.2007, p. 315-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Echols, Melvin R. ; Mahaffey, Kenneth W. ; Banerjee, Anindita ; Pieper, Karen S. ; Stebbins, Amanda ; Lansky, Alexandra ; Cohen, Mauricio G ; Velazquez, Eric ; Santos, Renato ; Newby, L. Kristin ; Gurfinkel, Enrique P. ; Biasucci, Luigi ; Ferguson, James J. ; Califf, Robert M. / Racial Differences Among High-Risk Patients Presenting With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Results from the SYNERGY Trial)†Disclosure : Drs. Mahaffey, Cohen, Newby, Ferguson, and Califf have received honoria for speaking from sanofi-aventis. Drs. Mahaffey, Ferguson, and Califf have acted as consultants for sanofi-aventis. Drs. Echols, Velazquez, Santos. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2007 ; Vol. 99, No. 3. pp. 315-321.
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abstract = "Full title. Racial Differences Among High-Risk Patients Presenting With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Results from the SYNERGY Trial)††Disclosure: Drs. Mahaffey, Cohen, Newby, Ferguson, and Califf have received honoria for speaking from sanofi-aventis. Drs. Mahaffey, Ferguson, and Califf have acted as consultants for sanofi-aventis. Drs. Echols, Velazquez, Santos, and Gurfinkel have no financial relationships to disclose. Management and outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) may vary according to patient race and ethnicity. To assess racial differences in presentation and outcome in high-risk North American patients with non-ST-segment elevation (NSTE) ACS, we analyzed baseline racial/ethnic differences and all-cause death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in 6,077 white, 586 African-American, and 344 Hispanic patients through 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year follow-up. Frequencies of hypertension were 66{\%} for whites, 83{\%} for African-Americans, and 78{\%} for Hispanics (overall p <0.001). Use of angiography was similar across groups. Use of percutaneous coronary intervention (46{\%} for whites, 41{\%} for African-Americans, and 45{\%} for Hispanics, overall p = 0.046) and coronary artery bypass grafting (20{\%} for whites, 16{\%} for African-Americans, and 22{\%} for Hispanics, overall p = 0.044) differed. African-American patients had significantly fewer diseased vessels compared with white patients (p = 0.0001). Thirty-day death or MI was 14{\%} for whites, 10{\%} for African-Americans, and 14{\%} for Hispanics (overall p = 0.034). After adjustment for baseline variables, African-American patients had lower 30-day death or MI compared with white patients (odds ratio 0.73, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.55 to 0.98). There were no differences in 6-month death or MI across racial/ethnic groups. In conclusion, baseline clinical characteristics differed across North American racial/ethnic groups in the SYNERGY trial. African-American patients had significantly better adjusted 30-day outcomes but similar 6-month outcomes compared with white patients.",
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N2 - Full title. Racial Differences Among High-Risk Patients Presenting With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Results from the SYNERGY Trial)††Disclosure: Drs. Mahaffey, Cohen, Newby, Ferguson, and Califf have received honoria for speaking from sanofi-aventis. Drs. Mahaffey, Ferguson, and Califf have acted as consultants for sanofi-aventis. Drs. Echols, Velazquez, Santos, and Gurfinkel have no financial relationships to disclose. Management and outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) may vary according to patient race and ethnicity. To assess racial differences in presentation and outcome in high-risk North American patients with non-ST-segment elevation (NSTE) ACS, we analyzed baseline racial/ethnic differences and all-cause death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in 6,077 white, 586 African-American, and 344 Hispanic patients through 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year follow-up. Frequencies of hypertension were 66% for whites, 83% for African-Americans, and 78% for Hispanics (overall p <0.001). Use of angiography was similar across groups. Use of percutaneous coronary intervention (46% for whites, 41% for African-Americans, and 45% for Hispanics, overall p = 0.046) and coronary artery bypass grafting (20% for whites, 16% for African-Americans, and 22% for Hispanics, overall p = 0.044) differed. African-American patients had significantly fewer diseased vessels compared with white patients (p = 0.0001). Thirty-day death or MI was 14% for whites, 10% for African-Americans, and 14% for Hispanics (overall p = 0.034). After adjustment for baseline variables, African-American patients had lower 30-day death or MI compared with white patients (odds ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.55 to 0.98). There were no differences in 6-month death or MI across racial/ethnic groups. In conclusion, baseline clinical characteristics differed across North American racial/ethnic groups in the SYNERGY trial. African-American patients had significantly better adjusted 30-day outcomes but similar 6-month outcomes compared with white patients.

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