Racial bias in the manager-employee relationship: An analysis of quits, dismissals, and promotions at a large retail firm

Laura Giuliano, David I. Levine, Jonathan Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from a large U.S. retail firm, we examine how racial matches between managers and their employees affect rates of employee quits, dismissals, and promotions. We exploit changes in management at hundreds of stores to estimate hazard models with store fixed effects that control for all unobserved differences across store locations. We find a general pattern of own-race bias in that employees usually have better outcomes when they are the same race as their manager. But we do find anomalies in this pattern, particularly when the manager-employee match violates traditional racial hierarchies (for example, nonwhites managing whites).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-52
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Human Resources
Volume46
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Managers
Personnel
Hazards
Retail
Employees
Quits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Racial bias in the manager-employee relationship : An analysis of quits, dismissals, and promotions at a large retail firm. / Giuliano, Laura; Levine, David I.; Leonard, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 26-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giuliano, Laura ; Levine, David I. ; Leonard, Jonathan. / Racial bias in the manager-employee relationship : An analysis of quits, dismissals, and promotions at a large retail firm. In: Journal of Human Resources. 2011 ; Vol. 46, No. 1. pp. 26-52.
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