Race/ethnic disparity in hypertension-related hospitalization in Florida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: While racial disparity in the treatment of hypertension has been documented, disparity among hospitalized patients is relatively understudied. Our objective was to compare the characteristics among Black, White, and Hispanic patients hospitalized for hypertension. Methods: The de-identified, public use hospital discharge file of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) in 2001 was utilized. Discharge records with primary diagnosis of essential hypertension using the International Classification of Diseases code were included. The differences between three groups were tested using the chi-square tests and the multiple regression models. Results: Discharge records that belonged to White, Black or Hispanic in-patients (N = 7,102) were included. Average age (years) and standard error (SE) of patients were 53.1 ± 0.4 (Blacks), 63.6 ± 0.5 (Hispanics), and 66.7 ± 0.3 (Whites). Most patients were discharged home, but more Whites (15.9%) were discharged to another facility followed by Hispanics (11.3%) and Blacks (9.6%). More Blacks and Hispanics were underinsured or uninsured compared with Whites. The adjusted length of stay was 3.2 (Blacks), 3.1 (Hispanics), and 2.9 (Whites) days (P<.01). The adjusted total hospital charges were not different. Conclusions: Although the prevalence of hypertension was the highest among Blacks followed by Whites and Hispanics in Florida, more Whites (57.1%) were hospitalized followed by Blacks (28.6%) and Hispanics (14.3%). Further, the discharge status, insurance type and adjusted length of stay varied by race/ethnicity. Future studies should examine potential causes (severity of hypertension, comorbidity, and access to preventive care) of disparity between race/ethnic groups of Florida.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-460
Number of pages8
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume17
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Hospitalization
Hypertension
Length of Stay
Hospital Charges
Preventive Medicine
Insurance Coverage
Public Hospitals
International Classification of Diseases
Chi-Square Distribution
Ethnic Groups
Comorbidity
Delivery of Health Care
hydroquinone

Keywords

  • Black
  • Ethnicity
  • Hispanic
  • Hospitalization
  • Hypertension
  • White

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Race/ethnic disparity in hypertension-related hospitalization in Florida. / Hlaing, WayWay.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.06.2007, p. 453-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: While racial disparity in the treatment of hypertension has been documented, disparity among hospitalized patients is relatively understudied. Our objective was to compare the characteristics among Black, White, and Hispanic patients hospitalized for hypertension. Methods: The de-identified, public use hospital discharge file of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) in 2001 was utilized. Discharge records with primary diagnosis of essential hypertension using the International Classification of Diseases code were included. The differences between three groups were tested using the chi-square tests and the multiple regression models. Results: Discharge records that belonged to White, Black or Hispanic in-patients (N = 7,102) were included. Average age (years) and standard error (SE) of patients were 53.1 ± 0.4 (Blacks), 63.6 ± 0.5 (Hispanics), and 66.7 ± 0.3 (Whites). Most patients were discharged home, but more Whites (15.9{\%}) were discharged to another facility followed by Hispanics (11.3{\%}) and Blacks (9.6{\%}). More Blacks and Hispanics were underinsured or uninsured compared with Whites. The adjusted length of stay was 3.2 (Blacks), 3.1 (Hispanics), and 2.9 (Whites) days (P<.01). The adjusted total hospital charges were not different. Conclusions: Although the prevalence of hypertension was the highest among Blacks followed by Whites and Hispanics in Florida, more Whites (57.1{\%}) were hospitalized followed by Blacks (28.6{\%}) and Hispanics (14.3{\%}). Further, the discharge status, insurance type and adjusted length of stay varied by race/ethnicity. Future studies should examine potential causes (severity of hypertension, comorbidity, and access to preventive care) of disparity between race/ethnic groups of Florida.",
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