Race/ethnic differences in obstructive sleep apnea risk in patients with acute ischemic strokes in south Florida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but it may differ between race/ethnic groups. The goal of our study was to examine the pre-stroke risk of OSA between three race/ethnic groups admitted for acute ischemic stroke in a tertiary urban hospital in South Florida. Methods: Our sample was composed of patients with acute ischemic strokes evaluated at a teaching hospital over a 3-year period. Race/ethnicity was defined by self-identification, modeled after the US census and categorized into non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. Pre-stroke risk of OSA was assessed with the Berlin questionnaire and categorized into high- or low-risk categories. We performed binary logistic regression to evaluate the pre-stroke risk of OSA in Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks with non-Hispanic whites as the reference, adjusting for age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking. Results: There were 176 patients with acute ischemic strokes of which 44 % were Hispanics, 44 % non-Hispanic Blacks, and 12 % non-Hispanic whites. A higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA was seen in 60 % of Hispanics, 54 % of non-Hispanic blacks, and 33 % of non-Hispanic whites. Hispanics (OR, 2.6; 95 % CI 1.1-6.4) had a higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA compared to non-Hispanic whites, adjusting for covariates. There were no differences between non-Hispanic blacks (OR, 1.2; 0.5-2.9 and non-Hispanic whites. Discussion: We observed higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA in Hispanics with acute ischemic strokes in South Florida.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-168
Number of pages4
JournalSleep and Breathing
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Stroke
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Urban Hospitals
Berlin
Censuses
Tertiary Care Centers
Teaching Hospitals
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Smoking
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Berlin questionnaire
  • Ethnicity
  • Hispanic
  • Race
  • Risk factors
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Race/ethnic differences in obstructive sleep apnea risk in patients with acute ischemic strokes in south Florida. / Ramos, Alberto; Guilliam, Daniela; Dib, Salim; Koch, Sebastian.

In: Sleep and Breathing, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 165-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but it may differ between race/ethnic groups. The goal of our study was to examine the pre-stroke risk of OSA between three race/ethnic groups admitted for acute ischemic stroke in a tertiary urban hospital in South Florida. Methods: Our sample was composed of patients with acute ischemic strokes evaluated at a teaching hospital over a 3-year period. Race/ethnicity was defined by self-identification, modeled after the US census and categorized into non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. Pre-stroke risk of OSA was assessed with the Berlin questionnaire and categorized into high- or low-risk categories. We performed binary logistic regression to evaluate the pre-stroke risk of OSA in Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks with non-Hispanic whites as the reference, adjusting for age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking. Results: There were 176 patients with acute ischemic strokes of which 44 {\%} were Hispanics, 44 {\%} non-Hispanic Blacks, and 12 {\%} non-Hispanic whites. A higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA was seen in 60 {\%} of Hispanics, 54 {\%} of non-Hispanic blacks, and 33 {\%} of non-Hispanic whites. Hispanics (OR, 2.6; 95 {\%} CI 1.1-6.4) had a higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA compared to non-Hispanic whites, adjusting for covariates. There were no differences between non-Hispanic blacks (OR, 1.2; 0.5-2.9 and non-Hispanic whites. Discussion: We observed higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA in Hispanics with acute ischemic strokes in South Florida.",
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N2 - Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but it may differ between race/ethnic groups. The goal of our study was to examine the pre-stroke risk of OSA between three race/ethnic groups admitted for acute ischemic stroke in a tertiary urban hospital in South Florida. Methods: Our sample was composed of patients with acute ischemic strokes evaluated at a teaching hospital over a 3-year period. Race/ethnicity was defined by self-identification, modeled after the US census and categorized into non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. Pre-stroke risk of OSA was assessed with the Berlin questionnaire and categorized into high- or low-risk categories. We performed binary logistic regression to evaluate the pre-stroke risk of OSA in Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks with non-Hispanic whites as the reference, adjusting for age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking. Results: There were 176 patients with acute ischemic strokes of which 44 % were Hispanics, 44 % non-Hispanic Blacks, and 12 % non-Hispanic whites. A higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA was seen in 60 % of Hispanics, 54 % of non-Hispanic blacks, and 33 % of non-Hispanic whites. Hispanics (OR, 2.6; 95 % CI 1.1-6.4) had a higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA compared to non-Hispanic whites, adjusting for covariates. There were no differences between non-Hispanic blacks (OR, 1.2; 0.5-2.9 and non-Hispanic whites. Discussion: We observed higher frequency of patients at high risk for OSA in Hispanics with acute ischemic strokes in South Florida.

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