Race and ethnicity in the evidence for integrating palliative care into oncology

William F. Pirl, Estefany Saez-Flores, Matthew Schlumbrecht, Ryan Nipp, Lara N. Traeger, Erin Kobetz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose ASCOrecommends early involvement of palliative care for patients with advanced cancers onthe basis of evidence from18randomized trials.Weexamined racial and ethnic minority representation in these trials and the role of race and ethnicity in the statistical analyses. The goal was to identify specific gaps in the palliative care evidence base for these individuals and potential strategies to address them. Methods We reviewed the 18 trials cited in the 2012 and 2017 ASCO clinical statements on integrating palliative care into oncology. We extracted data on the reporting and categorization of race and ethnicity, on the enrollment of specific racial and ethnic minority groups, and on how race and ethnicity were addressed in the analyses. Results One third of patient trials reported representation of specific racial and ethnic minority groups, one third reported rates of "white" versus "other," and one third did not report race or ethnicity data. Among the patient trials with race and ethnicity data, 9.9% of participants were Asian, 8.8% Hispanic/Latino, and 5.7% African American. Analyses that used race and ethnicity were primarily baseline comparisons among randomized groups. Conclusion Race and ethnicity were inconsistently reported in the trials. Among those that provided race and ethnicity data, representation of specific racial and ethnic minority groups waslow. In addition tomoreresearch in centers with large minority populations, consistent reporting of race and ethnicity and supplementary data collection from minority patients who participate in trials may be strategies for improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e346-e356
JournalJournal of Oncology Practice
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Palliative Care
Minority Groups
Ethnic Groups
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Research Design
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Race and ethnicity in the evidence for integrating palliative care into oncology. / Pirl, William F.; Saez-Flores, Estefany; Schlumbrecht, Matthew; Nipp, Ryan; Traeger, Lara N.; Kobetz, Erin.

In: Journal of Oncology Practice, Vol. 14, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. e346-e356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pirl, WF, Saez-Flores, E, Schlumbrecht, M, Nipp, R, Traeger, LN & Kobetz, E 2018, 'Race and ethnicity in the evidence for integrating palliative care into oncology', Journal of Oncology Practice, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. e346-e356. https://doi.org/10.1200/JOP.17.00016
Pirl, William F. ; Saez-Flores, Estefany ; Schlumbrecht, Matthew ; Nipp, Ryan ; Traeger, Lara N. ; Kobetz, Erin. / Race and ethnicity in the evidence for integrating palliative care into oncology. In: Journal of Oncology Practice. 2018 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. e346-e356.
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