Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Knee Osteoarthritis Progression over Two Years and Correlation with Clinical Symptoms and Radiologic Changes

Jean Pierre Raynauld, Johanne Martel-Pelletier, Marie Josée Berthiaume, Françoys Labonté, Gilles Beaudoin, Jacques A. De Guise, Daniel A. Bloch, Denis Choquette, Boulos Haraoui, Roy D Altman, Marc C. Hochberg, Joan M. Meyer, Gary A. Cline, Jean Pierre Pelletier

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Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the change in osteoarthritic (OA) knee cartilage volume over a two-year period with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MRI changes with radiologic changes. Methods. Thirty-two patients with symptomatic knee OA underwent MRI of the knee at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Loss of cartilage volumes were computed and contrasted with changes in clinical variables for OA and with standardized semiflexed knee radiographs at baseline at 1 and 2 years. Results. Progression of cartilage loss at all followup points was statistically significant (P <0.0001), with a mean ± SD of 3.8 ± 5.1% for global cartilage loss and 4.3 ± 6.5% for medial compartment cartilage loss at 6 months, 3.6 ± 5.1% and 4.2 ± 7.5% at 12 months, and 6.1 ± 7.2% and 7.6 ± 8.6% at 24 months. Discriminant function analysis identified 2 groups of patients, those who progressed slowly (15% of global cartilage loss; n = 11) over the 2 years of study. At baseline, there was a greater proportion of women (P = 0.001), a lower range of motion (P = 0.01), a greater circumference and higher level of pain (P = 0.05) and stiffness in the study knee, and a higher body mass index in the fast progressor group compared with the slow progressor group. No statistical correlation between loss of cartilage volume and radiographic changes was seen. Conclusion. Quantitative MRI can. measure the progression of knee OA precisely and can help to identify patients with rapidly progressing disease. These findings indicate that MRI could be heipful in assessing the effects of treatment with structure-modifying agents in OA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-487
Number of pages12
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

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Knee Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Knee
Discriminant Analysis
Articular Range of Motion
Body Mass Index
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Raynauld, J. P., Martel-Pelletier, J., Berthiaume, M. J., Labonté, F., Beaudoin, G., De Guise, J. A., ... Pelletier, J. P. (2004). Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Knee Osteoarthritis Progression over Two Years and Correlation with Clinical Symptoms and Radiologic Changes. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 50(2), 476-487. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.20000

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Knee Osteoarthritis Progression over Two Years and Correlation with Clinical Symptoms and Radiologic Changes. / Raynauld, Jean Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Berthiaume, Marie Josée; Labonté, Françoys; Beaudoin, Gilles; De Guise, Jacques A.; Bloch, Daniel A.; Choquette, Denis; Haraoui, Boulos; Altman, Roy D; Hochberg, Marc C.; Meyer, Joan M.; Cline, Gary A.; Pelletier, Jean Pierre.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 50, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 476-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raynauld, JP, Martel-Pelletier, J, Berthiaume, MJ, Labonté, F, Beaudoin, G, De Guise, JA, Bloch, DA, Choquette, D, Haraoui, B, Altman, RD, Hochberg, MC, Meyer, JM, Cline, GA & Pelletier, JP 2004, 'Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Knee Osteoarthritis Progression over Two Years and Correlation with Clinical Symptoms and Radiologic Changes', Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 476-487. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.20000
Raynauld, Jean Pierre ; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne ; Berthiaume, Marie Josée ; Labonté, Françoys ; Beaudoin, Gilles ; De Guise, Jacques A. ; Bloch, Daniel A. ; Choquette, Denis ; Haraoui, Boulos ; Altman, Roy D ; Hochberg, Marc C. ; Meyer, Joan M. ; Cline, Gary A. ; Pelletier, Jean Pierre. / Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Knee Osteoarthritis Progression over Two Years and Correlation with Clinical Symptoms and Radiologic Changes. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2004 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 476-487.
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abstract = "Objective. To evaluate the change in osteoarthritic (OA) knee cartilage volume over a two-year period with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MRI changes with radiologic changes. Methods. Thirty-two patients with symptomatic knee OA underwent MRI of the knee at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Loss of cartilage volumes were computed and contrasted with changes in clinical variables for OA and with standardized semiflexed knee radiographs at baseline at 1 and 2 years. Results. Progression of cartilage loss at all followup points was statistically significant (P <0.0001), with a mean ± SD of 3.8 ± 5.1{\%} for global cartilage loss and 4.3 ± 6.5{\%} for medial compartment cartilage loss at 6 months, 3.6 ± 5.1{\%} and 4.2 ± 7.5{\%} at 12 months, and 6.1 ± 7.2{\%} and 7.6 ± 8.6{\%} at 24 months. Discriminant function analysis identified 2 groups of patients, those who progressed slowly (15{\%} of global cartilage loss; n = 11) over the 2 years of study. At baseline, there was a greater proportion of women (P = 0.001), a lower range of motion (P = 0.01), a greater circumference and higher level of pain (P = 0.05) and stiffness in the study knee, and a higher body mass index in the fast progressor group compared with the slow progressor group. No statistical correlation between loss of cartilage volume and radiographic changes was seen. Conclusion. Quantitative MRI can. measure the progression of knee OA precisely and can help to identify patients with rapidly progressing disease. These findings indicate that MRI could be heipful in assessing the effects of treatment with structure-modifying agents in OA.",
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AU - Raynauld, Jean Pierre

AU - Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

AU - Berthiaume, Marie Josée

AU - Labonté, Françoys

AU - Beaudoin, Gilles

AU - De Guise, Jacques A.

AU - Bloch, Daniel A.

AU - Choquette, Denis

AU - Haraoui, Boulos

AU - Altman, Roy D

AU - Hochberg, Marc C.

AU - Meyer, Joan M.

AU - Cline, Gary A.

AU - Pelletier, Jean Pierre

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N2 - Objective. To evaluate the change in osteoarthritic (OA) knee cartilage volume over a two-year period with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MRI changes with radiologic changes. Methods. Thirty-two patients with symptomatic knee OA underwent MRI of the knee at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Loss of cartilage volumes were computed and contrasted with changes in clinical variables for OA and with standardized semiflexed knee radiographs at baseline at 1 and 2 years. Results. Progression of cartilage loss at all followup points was statistically significant (P <0.0001), with a mean ± SD of 3.8 ± 5.1% for global cartilage loss and 4.3 ± 6.5% for medial compartment cartilage loss at 6 months, 3.6 ± 5.1% and 4.2 ± 7.5% at 12 months, and 6.1 ± 7.2% and 7.6 ± 8.6% at 24 months. Discriminant function analysis identified 2 groups of patients, those who progressed slowly (15% of global cartilage loss; n = 11) over the 2 years of study. At baseline, there was a greater proportion of women (P = 0.001), a lower range of motion (P = 0.01), a greater circumference and higher level of pain (P = 0.05) and stiffness in the study knee, and a higher body mass index in the fast progressor group compared with the slow progressor group. No statistical correlation between loss of cartilage volume and radiographic changes was seen. Conclusion. Quantitative MRI can. measure the progression of knee OA precisely and can help to identify patients with rapidly progressing disease. These findings indicate that MRI could be heipful in assessing the effects of treatment with structure-modifying agents in OA.

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