Quantifying the effects of pop-up satellite archival tags on the swimming performance and behavior of young-adult mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus)

Charles J. McGuigan, Lela S. Schlenker, John Stieglitz, Daniel D Benetti, Martin Grosell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) have been used to demonstrate habitat utilization and large-scale migrations of aquatic species and are a critical tool to manage highly migratory fish populations. Use of PSATs has increased in recent years; however, few studies have investigated the physiological and behavioral effects of carrying a PSAT. To address this gap, young-adult mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus; 25–35 cm fork length) were tagged with miniature PSATs and assessed in a two-part experiment utilizing swim tunnel respirometry and behavioral analysis of free-swimming individuals. Swim tunnel respirometry revealed significant reductions in the critical and optimal swimming speeds of tagged fish (10.2% and 20.9%, respectively), as well as significant reductions in maximum metabolic rate and aerobic scope (16.1% and 21.4%, respec-tively). In contrast, mean and maximum velocity, acceleration, total distance traveled, survival, and feeding success of free-swimming tagged fish showed no impacts of tagging compared with untagged conspecifics held in the same tank. The results of this study highlight the importance of considering multiple methodologies to assess the impacts of tagging fish and provide insight into the data collected by PSATs deployed on wild fish.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-39
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

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