Quantifying neuronal importance in value-based brain-machine interfaces

Jack DiGiovanna, Babak Mahmoudi, Jose Principe, Justin C. Sanchez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMI) actively learn to control a prosthetic device using a relatively small number of neurons. Once the task is successfully learned, what information can be extracted from the BMI control mapping? Most BMIs reconstruct trajectories and ascertaining neural contributions is possible via sensitivity analysis of the input-output relationship. Value-based (a subset of goal-based) BMIs judge possible actions to find a best action at each time step and the sequence of selected actions will form a trajectory. Here, we expand the sensitivity analysis of trajectory-based BMI such that it applies to value-based BMI. Our finding that only a subset of recorded neurons contributes most to prosthetic control agrees with prior BMI research. Additionally, we find some specialization in neurons, i.e. certain neurons contribute to a subset of actions while other neurons contribute to different actions. Finally, we discuss implications of this metric and areas for future improvement.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09
Pages307-310
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09 - Antalya, Turkey
Duration: Apr 29 2009May 2 2009

Other

Other2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09
CountryTurkey
CityAntalya
Period4/29/095/2/09

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Neurons
Brain
Trajectories
Prosthetics
Sensitivity analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Research

Keywords

  • Neuronal importance
  • Sensitivity
  • Value-based BMI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

DiGiovanna, J., Mahmoudi, B., Principe, J., & Sanchez, J. C. (2009). Quantifying neuronal importance in value-based brain-machine interfaces. In 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09 (pp. 307-310). [5109294] https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2009.5109294

Quantifying neuronal importance in value-based brain-machine interfaces. / DiGiovanna, Jack; Mahmoudi, Babak; Principe, Jose; Sanchez, Justin C.

2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09. 2009. p. 307-310 5109294.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

DiGiovanna, J, Mahmoudi, B, Principe, J & Sanchez, JC 2009, Quantifying neuronal importance in value-based brain-machine interfaces. in 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09., 5109294, pp. 307-310, 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09, Antalya, Turkey, 4/29/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2009.5109294
DiGiovanna J, Mahmoudi B, Principe J, Sanchez JC. Quantifying neuronal importance in value-based brain-machine interfaces. In 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09. 2009. p. 307-310. 5109294 https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2009.5109294
DiGiovanna, Jack ; Mahmoudi, Babak ; Principe, Jose ; Sanchez, Justin C. / Quantifying neuronal importance in value-based brain-machine interfaces. 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09. 2009. pp. 307-310
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