Quantifying and understanding protein adsorption to non-fouling surfaces

Ashutosh Agarwal, Parag Katira, Henry Hess

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Surfaces grafted with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) are known to resist protein adsorption. Research efforts in this field have focused on both developing surfaces with better resistance to protein adsorption and understanding the origin of resistance of PEO grafted surfaces to protein adsorption. In the first part of this contribution, we describe a novel quantification technique for extremely low protein coverage on surfaces. This technique utilizes measurement of the landing rate of microtubule filaments on kinesin proteins adsorbed on a surface to determine the kinesin density. The detection limit of our technique is 100 times lower than that of standard characterization methods and is employed to test the performance of novel and established coatings with outstanding resistance to protein adsorption. In the second part, a random sequential adsorption (RSA) model is presented for protein adsorption to PEO coated surfaces. The model suggests that PEO chains act as almost perfect steric barriers to protein adsorption. Furthermore, it can be used to predict the performance of a variety of systems towards resisting protein adsorption and can help in the design of better nonfouling surface coatings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2010 IEEE 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Mar 26 2010Mar 28 2010

Other

Other36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period3/26/103/28/10

Fingerprint

Proteins
Adsorption
Polyethylene oxides
Kinesin
Coatings
Landing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Agarwal, A., Katira, P., & Hess, H. (2010). Quantifying and understanding protein adsorption to non-fouling surfaces. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010 [5458217] https://doi.org/10.1109/NEBC.2010.5458217

Quantifying and understanding protein adsorption to non-fouling surfaces. / Agarwal, Ashutosh; Katira, Parag; Hess, Henry.

Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010. 2010. 5458217.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Agarwal, A, Katira, P & Hess, H 2010, Quantifying and understanding protein adsorption to non-fouling surfaces. in Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010., 5458217, 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010, New York, NY, United States, 3/26/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/NEBC.2010.5458217
Agarwal A, Katira P, Hess H. Quantifying and understanding protein adsorption to non-fouling surfaces. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010. 2010. 5458217 https://doi.org/10.1109/NEBC.2010.5458217
Agarwal, Ashutosh ; Katira, Parag ; Hess, Henry. / Quantifying and understanding protein adsorption to non-fouling surfaces. Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE 36th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2010. 2010.
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