Quality of life of low-vision patients and the impact of low-vision services

Ingrid U. Scott, William E Smiddy, Joyce Schiffman, William J Feuer, Charles J. Pappas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

216 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the functional status and quality of life of patients at a low-vision clinic and to evaluate the impact of low-vision services. METHODS: Interviews, including the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36), the Visual Function-14 (VF-14), and the 51-item Field Test Version of the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ), were administered to 156 consecutive patients 1 week before and 3 months after their low-vision clinic visit. RESULTS: Low-vision patients scored lower (P < .001) in physical functioning and role limitations caused by physical and emotional health problems than published SF-36 scores of the age-appropriate United States normal population, patients with congestive heart failure, and clinically depressed patients. Low-vision services were associated with improvement in the subjective functional status of 150 patients (98.7%) and were rated 'very useful' by 82 (53.9%) patients. The SF- 36 scores did not change significantly after low-vision services. The VF-14 mean score improved from 35.8 to 41.2 (P < .001). Four NEI-VFQ subscale scores improved significantly (P < .001): general vision, near activities, distance activities, and peripheral vision. CONCLUSIONS: The SF-36, VF-14, and NEI-VFQ demonstrate that low-vision clinic patients perceive marked impairment of functional status and quality of life. Low-vision services are associated with high patient satisfaction. Vision-targeted questionnaires are more sensitive than general health-related quality of life questionnaires to changes in functional status and quality of life after low-vision services, and they may help elucidate the outcomes of low-vision services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-62
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume128
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1999

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Low Vision
Quality of Life
National Eye Institute (U.S.)
Ambulatory Care
Patient Satisfaction
Heart Failure
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Quality of life of low-vision patients and the impact of low-vision services. / Scott, Ingrid U.; Smiddy, William E; Schiffman, Joyce; Feuer, William J; Pappas, Charles J.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 128, No. 1, 01.07.1999, p. 54-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, Ingrid U. ; Smiddy, William E ; Schiffman, Joyce ; Feuer, William J ; Pappas, Charles J. / Quality of life of low-vision patients and the impact of low-vision services. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 1999 ; Vol. 128, No. 1. pp. 54-62.
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