Quality of life among long-term survivors of breast cancer: Different types of antecedents predict different classes of outcomes

Charles S. Carver, Roselyn G. Smith, Vida M. Petronis, Michael H. Antoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

Quality of life (QOL) has many aspects, both in the short-term and in the long-term. Different aspects of QOL may have different types of precursors: demographic, medical, and psychosocial. We examined this possibility in a group of long-term breast cancer survivors. Early-stage breast cancer patients (N = 163) who had provided information about medical, demographic, and psychosocial variables during the year after surgery completed a multidimensional measure of QOL 5-13 years later. Initial chemotherapy and higher stage predicted greater financial problems and greater worry about appearance at follow-up. Being partnered at diagnosis predicted many psychosocial benefits at follow-up. Hispanic women reported greater distress and social avoidance at follow-up. Initial trait optimism predicted diverse aspects of better psychosocial QOL at follow-up, but not other aspects of QOL. Thus, different aspects of QOL at long-term follow-up had different antecedents. Overall, psychological outcomes were predicted by psychosocial variables, presence of a partner at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Financial outcomes, in contrast, were predicted by medical variables, which otherwise predicted little about long-term QOL. This divergence among aspects of QOL should receive closer attention in future work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-758
Number of pages10
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume15
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

Keywords

  • Adjustment
  • Breast cancer
  • Long-term survivors
  • Personality
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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