Quality improvement in backrest elevation: improving outcomes in critical care.

Mary Jo Grap, Cindy Munro

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The positioning of critically ill patients is an independent nursing decision, often has multiple rationales, and may significantly affect morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that backrest elevation in critically ill patients may reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, use of recommended levels of backrest elevation is infrequent in the critical care environment. In addition, published guidelines for backrest elevation to reduce pneumonia conflict with those for protecting skin integrity. This article reviews the benefits and complications of backrest elevation, data related to current positioning practices, and recommendations for backrest elevation. A quality improvement process to guide evidence-based care related to backrest positioning is also described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalAACN clinical issues
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quality Improvement
Critical Illness
Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia
Critical Care
Pneumonia
Nursing
Guidelines
Morbidity
Skin
Mortality
Critical Care Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Medicine(all)
  • Care Planning
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Quality improvement in backrest elevation : improving outcomes in critical care. / Grap, Mary Jo; Munro, Cindy.

In: AACN clinical issues, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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