Pyridine nucleotide redox state and blood flow of the cerebral cortex following middle cerebral artery occlusion in the cat

Myron D. Ginsberg, Martin Reivich, Stanley Frinak, Klaus Harbig, Stanley Frinak, Klaus Harbig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acute changes in the redox state of NADH in the cerebral cortex of cats were investigated following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and were correlated with alterations of regional cerebral blood flow in the ischemic cortex determined autoradiographically. Arterial occlusion was accomplished via the transorbital approach. Cortical fluorescence and reflected light signals were recorded from the central MCA territory by means of a beam splitting fluorometer, and a fluorescence signal corrected for alterations in intravascular hemoglobin was derived. Following arterial occlusion, there was a rapid increase in cortical NADH fluorescence, peaking within 30 to 70 seconds at 20% to 40% of full scale. This was followed by a slow linear decline in fluorescence over the next several minutes. The behavior of cortical NADH fluorescence was unaffected by replacement of the ambient air over the cortical surface with nitrogen. Mean regional blood flow values in the most ischemic gyri two to 15 minutes following arterial occlusion were 21% to 23% of the corresponding values in the opposite, nonischemic hemisphere. In individual animals, peak NADH fluorescence values following arterial occlusion correlated with the extent of blood flow reduction in the affected ischemic gyri (P < 0.05).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalStroke
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1976
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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