Public speaking apprehension, decision-making errors in the selection of speech introduction strategies and adherence to strategy

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the choice-making processes of students engaged in the selection ojspeech introduction strategies. The students were preparing for actual presentations which held considerable potential for impacting their course grades and options. One of three introduction strategies was to be selected and used by students; humor, startling fact or statement and preview of speech topic. Students estimated the probability of attaining high and moderate levels of success as well as probability of failure. In addition, students estimated the anticipated effectiveness of each strategy under each level of success or failure, estimated the likelihood of implementing each strategy and designated one for use on performance day. The strategy actually employed was recorded. Results indicated that (1) the frequency of students making decision-making errors was a positive function of public speaking apprehension and (2) highly apprehensive speakers were not less adherent than low apprehensives but moderate apprehensives were more likely to employ their plan than were either high or low apprehensives. Results are consistent with theoretical expectations and teaching systematic decision-making in communication classrooms is discussed and recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-311
Number of pages15
JournalCommunication Education
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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speaking
Decision making
Students
decision making
student
humor
Decision Making
Apprehension
Adherence
Public Speaking
Teaching
classroom
communication
Communication
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Education

Cite this

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abstract = "The present study examined the choice-making processes of students engaged in the selection ojspeech introduction strategies. The students were preparing for actual presentations which held considerable potential for impacting their course grades and options. One of three introduction strategies was to be selected and used by students; humor, startling fact or statement and preview of speech topic. Students estimated the probability of attaining high and moderate levels of success as well as probability of failure. In addition, students estimated the anticipated effectiveness of each strategy under each level of success or failure, estimated the likelihood of implementing each strategy and designated one for use on performance day. The strategy actually employed was recorded. Results indicated that (1) the frequency of students making decision-making errors was a positive function of public speaking apprehension and (2) highly apprehensive speakers were not less adherent than low apprehensives but moderate apprehensives were more likely to employ their plan than were either high or low apprehensives. Results are consistent with theoretical expectations and teaching systematic decision-making in communication classrooms is discussed and recommended.",
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