Psychosocial Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions for Young Women 18 to 26: Religiosity, Morality, Promiscuity, and Cancer Worry

Melinda M. Krakow, Jakob D. Jensen, Nick Carcioppolo, Jeremy Weaver, Miao Liu, Lisa M. Guntzviller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether five psychosocial variables, namely, religiosity, morality, perceived promiscuity, cancer worry frequency, and cancer worry severity, predict young women's intentions to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Methods: Female undergraduate students (. n=408) completed an online survey. Questions pertaining to hypothesized predictors were analyzed through bivariate correlations and hierarchical regression equations. Regressions examined whether the five psychosocial variables of interest predicted intentions to vaccinate above and beyond controls. Proposed interactions among predictor variables were also tested. Results: Study findings supported cancer worry as a direct predictor of HPV vaccination intention, and religiosity and sexual experience as moderators of the relationship between concerns of promiscuity reputation and intentions to vaccinate. One dimension of cancer worry (severity) emerged as a particularly robust predictor for this population. Conclusions: This study provides support for several important, yet understudied, factors contributing to HPV vaccination intentions among college-aged women: cancer worry severity and religiosity. Future research should continue to assess the predictive contributions of these variables and evaluate how messages and campaigns to increase HPV vaccination uptake can utilize religious involvement and worry about cancer to promote more effectively HPV vaccination as a cancer prevention strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

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