Psychosocial Correlates of Monocyte Activation and HIV Persistence in Methamphetamine Users

Kaitlin Grosgebauer, Jessica Salinas, Mark E Sharkey, Margaret Roach, Suresh Pallikkuth, Samantha E. Dilworth, Savita G Pahwa, Tulay Sengul, Mario Stevenson, Adam Carrico

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This cross-sectional study investigated the associations of psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders with monocyte activation and HIV persistence in a sample of 84 HIV-positive, methamphetamine-using sexual minority men with undetectable HIV viral load (<40 copies/mL). We examined if psychosocial factors were associated with decreased soluble CD14 (sCD14) and lower proviral HIV DNA. Multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, anti-retroviral therapy regimen, and CD4+ T-cell count. Time on ART was also included in models examining proviral HIV DNA. Greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers and higher social support for abstinence were independently associated with lower sCD14. Greater social support for abstinence was also independently associated with lower proviral HIV DNA. Psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders are associated with lower monocyte activation and decreased proviral HIV DNA. Findings underscore the need for longitudinal research to identify plausible mechanisms linking psychosocial factors and substance use with biological processes relevant to HIV pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of NeuroImmune Pharmacology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Monocytes
HIV
Psychology
DNA
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders
Linear Models
Biological Phenomena
Self Efficacy
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Cross-Sectional Studies
T-Lymphocytes
Research

Keywords

  • HIV persistence
  • Immune activation
  • Methamphetamine
  • Self-efficacy
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Psychosocial Correlates of Monocyte Activation and HIV Persistence in Methamphetamine Users",
abstract = "This cross-sectional study investigated the associations of psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders with monocyte activation and HIV persistence in a sample of 84 HIV-positive, methamphetamine-using sexual minority men with undetectable HIV viral load (<40 copies/mL). We examined if psychosocial factors were associated with decreased soluble CD14 (sCD14) and lower proviral HIV DNA. Multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, anti-retroviral therapy regimen, and CD4+ T-cell count. Time on ART was also included in models examining proviral HIV DNA. Greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers and higher social support for abstinence were independently associated with lower sCD14. Greater social support for abstinence was also independently associated with lower proviral HIV DNA. Psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders are associated with lower monocyte activation and decreased proviral HIV DNA. Findings underscore the need for longitudinal research to identify plausible mechanisms linking psychosocial factors and substance use with biological processes relevant to HIV pathogenesis.",
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AU - Salinas, Jessica

AU - Sharkey, Mark E

AU - Roach, Margaret

AU - Pallikkuth, Suresh

AU - Dilworth, Samantha E.

AU - Pahwa, Savita G

AU - Sengul, Tulay

AU - Stevenson, Mario

AU - Carrico, Adam

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N2 - This cross-sectional study investigated the associations of psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders with monocyte activation and HIV persistence in a sample of 84 HIV-positive, methamphetamine-using sexual minority men with undetectable HIV viral load (<40 copies/mL). We examined if psychosocial factors were associated with decreased soluble CD14 (sCD14) and lower proviral HIV DNA. Multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, anti-retroviral therapy regimen, and CD4+ T-cell count. Time on ART was also included in models examining proviral HIV DNA. Greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers and higher social support for abstinence were independently associated with lower sCD14. Greater social support for abstinence was also independently associated with lower proviral HIV DNA. Psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders are associated with lower monocyte activation and decreased proviral HIV DNA. Findings underscore the need for longitudinal research to identify plausible mechanisms linking psychosocial factors and substance use with biological processes relevant to HIV pathogenesis.

AB - This cross-sectional study investigated the associations of psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders with monocyte activation and HIV persistence in a sample of 84 HIV-positive, methamphetamine-using sexual minority men with undetectable HIV viral load (<40 copies/mL). We examined if psychosocial factors were associated with decreased soluble CD14 (sCD14) and lower proviral HIV DNA. Multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, anti-retroviral therapy regimen, and CD4+ T-cell count. Time on ART was also included in models examining proviral HIV DNA. Greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers and higher social support for abstinence were independently associated with lower sCD14. Greater social support for abstinence was also independently associated with lower proviral HIV DNA. Psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders are associated with lower monocyte activation and decreased proviral HIV DNA. Findings underscore the need for longitudinal research to identify plausible mechanisms linking psychosocial factors and substance use with biological processes relevant to HIV pathogenesis.

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