Psychosocial Correlates of Monocyte Activation and HIV Persistence in Methamphetamine Users

Kaitlin Grosgebauer, Jessica Salinas, Mark Sharkey, Margaret Roach, Suresh Pallikkuth, Samantha E. Dilworth, Savita Pahwa, Tulay Koru-Sengul, Mario Stevenson, Adam W. Carrico

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This cross-sectional study investigated the associations of psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders with monocyte activation and HIV persistence in a sample of 84 HIV-positive, methamphetamine-using sexual minority men with undetectable HIV viral load (<40 copies/mL). We examined if psychosocial factors were associated with decreased soluble CD14 (sCD14) and lower proviral HIV DNA. Multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, anti-retroviral therapy regimen, and CD4+ T-cell count. Time on ART was also included in models examining proviral HIV DNA. Greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers and higher social support for abstinence were independently associated with lower sCD14. Greater social support for abstinence was also independently associated with lower proviral HIV DNA. Psychosocial factors relevant to recovery from substance use disorders are associated with lower monocyte activation and decreased proviral HIV DNA. Findings underscore the need for longitudinal research to identify plausible mechanisms linking psychosocial factors and substance use with biological processes relevant to HIV pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2019

Keywords

  • HIV persistence
  • Immune activation
  • Methamphetamine
  • Self-efficacy
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

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