Psychosocial characteristics of adult daughters of breast cancer patients: Comparison of clinic and community caregivers samples

Lekeisha A. Sumner, David K. Wellisch, Youngmee Kim, Rachel L. Spillers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The long-term psychosocial impact of adult daughters caring for their mothers with breast cancer has been recognized but understudied. The objectives of this study were to characterize the psychosocial functioning of women who served as informal caregivers during their mothers. treatment for breast cancer in two distinct samples, community and high risk clinic, and to determine differences in psychosocial functioning between the two samples. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, a sample of mostly married, Caucasian and college educated women (N=59) were administered a battery of questionnaires assessing socio-demographic and psychosocial factors (i.e. coping, caregiving tasks and difficulty, social support, spirituality, mental distress, depressive symptoms). Results: Using descriptive analysis, chi-square and T tests, results demonstrated significant differences between the two samples in time since caregiving, with the community sample reporting few years since the caregiving episode (e.g. 2.1 versus 15.1 years); coping strategies, with the clinic sample reporting higher scores on active coping, behavioral disengagement, planning, and self-blame; support type care tasks difficulty, with the clinic sample reporting higher scores on emotional support and tangible support, and all domains of spirituality (e.g. peace, meaning, faith), with higher levels being reported by the community sample. Although participants did not exhibit clinically significant levels of emotional distress, almost 25% of the community sample and 10% of the clinic sample had clinically significant depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Findings underscore the need for interventions tailored for caregivers to consider the unique psychosocial characteristics of caregivers across settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-575
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2015

Fingerprint

Adult Children
Caregivers
Breast Neoplasms
Spirituality
Mothers
Depression
Chi-Square Distribution
Social Support
Demography
Psychology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • caregiving
  • daughters
  • psychosocial
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Psychosocial characteristics of adult daughters of breast cancer patients : Comparison of clinic and community caregivers samples. / Sumner, Lekeisha A.; Wellisch, David K.; Kim, Youngmee; Spillers, Rachel L.

In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Vol. 33, No. 5, 03.09.2015, p. 561-575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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