Psychiatric and behavioral side effects of anti-epileptic drugs in adolescents and children with epilepsy

B. Chen, K. Detyniecki, H. Choi, L. Hirsch, A. Katz, A. Legge, R. Wong, A. Jiang, R. Buchsbaum, P. Farooque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The objective of the study was to compare the psychiatric and behavioral side effect (PBSE) profiles of both older and newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in children and adolescent patients with epilepsy. Method We used logistic regression analysis to test the correlation between 83 non-AED/patient related potential predictor variables and the rate of PBSE. We then compared for each AED the rate of PBSEs and the rate of PBSEs that led to intolerability (IPBSE) while controlling for non-AED predictors of PBSEs. Results 922 patients (≤18 years old) were included in our study. PBSEs and IPBSEs occurred in 13.8% and 11.2% of patients, respectively. Overall, a history of psychiatric condition, absence seizures, intractable epilepsy, and frontal lobe epilepsy were significantly associated with increased PBSE rates. Levetiracetam (LEV) had the greatest PBSE rate (16.2%). This was significantly higher compared to other AEDs. LEV was also significantly associated with a high rate of IPBSEs (13.4%) and dose-decrease rates due to IPBSE (6.7%). Zonisamide (ZNS) was associated with significantly higher cessation rate due to IPBSE (9.1%) compared to other AEDs. Conclusion Patients with a history of psychiatric condition, absence seizures, intractable epilepsy, or frontal lobe epilepsy are more likely to develop PBSE. PBSEs appear to occur more frequently in adolescent and children patients taking LEV compared to other AEDs. LEV-attributed PBSEs are more likely to be associated with intolerability and subsequent decrease in dose. The rate of ZNS-attributed IPBSEs is more likely to be associated with complete cessation of AED.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-449
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Paediatric Neurology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antiepileptic drug
  • Behavioral side effect
  • Epilepsy
  • Psychiatric side effect
  • Risk factor
  • Seizure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

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