Provider-focused intervention increases adherence-related dialogue but does not improve antiretroviral therapy adherence in persons with HIV

Ira B. Wilson, Michael Barton Laws, Steven A. Safren, Yoojin Lee, Minyi Lu, William Coady, Paul R. Skolnik, William H. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Physicians' limited knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence may reduce their ability to perform effective adherence counseling. Methods: We conducted a randomized, cross-over study of an intervention to improve physicians' knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence. The intervention was a report given to the physician before a routine office visit that included data on Medication Event Monitoring System and self-reported data on antiretroviral adherence, patients' beliefs about antiretroviral therapy, reasons for missed doses, alcohol and drug use, and depression. We audio recorded 1 intervention and 1 control visit for each patient to analyze differences in adherence-related dialogue. Results: One hundred fifty-six patients were randomized, and 106 completed all 5 study visits. Paired audio recorded visits were available for 58 patients. Using a linear regression model that adjusted for site and baseline Medication Event Monitoring System adherence, adherence after intervention visits did not differ significantly from control visits (2.0% higher, P = 0.31, 95% confidence interval:-1.95% to 5.9%). There was a trend toward more total adherence-related utterances (median of 76 vs. 49.5, P = 0.07) and a significant increase in utterances about the current regimen (median of 51.5 vs. 32.5, P = 0.0002) in intervention compared with control visits. However, less than 10% of adherence-related utterances were classified as "problem solving" in content, and one third of physicians' problem-solving utterances were directive in nature. Conclusions: Receipt of a detailed report before clinic visits containing data about adherence and other factors did not improve patients' antiretroviral adherence. Analyses of patient-provider dialogue suggests that providers who care for persons with HIV may benefit from training in adherence counseling techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-347
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Communication
  • Electronic monitoring
  • HIV infections/drug therapy
  • Patient compliance
  • Physician-patient relations,randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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