Prospects and recommendations for risk mapping to improve strategies for effective malaria vector control interventions in Latin America

Temitope O. Alimi, Douglas Fuller, Martha L. Quinones, Rui De Xue, Socrates V. Herrera, Myriam Arevalo-Herrera, Jill N. Ulrich, Whitney A. Qualls, John C Beier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With malaria control in Latin America firmly established in most countries and a growing number of these countries in the pre-elimination phase, malaria elimination appears feasible. A review of the literature indicates that malaria elimination in this region will be difficult without locally tailored strategies for vector control, which depend on more research on vector ecology, genetics and behavioural responses to environmental changes, such as those caused by land cover alterations, and human population movements. An essential way to bridge the knowledge gap and improve vector control is through risk mapping. Malaria risk maps based on statistical and knowledge-based modelling can elucidate the links between environmental factors and malaria vectors, explain interactions between environmental changes and vector dynamics, and provide a heuristic to demonstrate how the environment shapes malaria transmission. To increase the utility of risk mapping in guiding vector control activities, definitions of malaria risk for mapping purposes must be standardized. The maps must also possess appropriate scale and resolution in order to become essential tools in integrated vector management (IVM), so that planners can target areas in greatest need of control measures. Fully integrating risk mapping into vector control programmes will make interventions more evidence-based, making malaria elimination more attainable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1052
JournalMalaria Journal
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 23 2015

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Latin America
Malaria
Behavioral Genetics
Genetic Vectors
Ecology
Research

Keywords

  • Anopheles
  • Environmental changes
  • Latin America
  • Malaria elimination
  • Mosquito ecology
  • Risk mapping
  • Vector control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Prospects and recommendations for risk mapping to improve strategies for effective malaria vector control interventions in Latin America. / Alimi, Temitope O.; Fuller, Douglas; Quinones, Martha L.; Xue, Rui De; Herrera, Socrates V.; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Ulrich, Jill N.; Qualls, Whitney A.; Beier, John C.

In: Malaria Journal, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1052, 23.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alimi, Temitope O. ; Fuller, Douglas ; Quinones, Martha L. ; Xue, Rui De ; Herrera, Socrates V. ; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam ; Ulrich, Jill N. ; Qualls, Whitney A. ; Beier, John C. / Prospects and recommendations for risk mapping to improve strategies for effective malaria vector control interventions in Latin America. In: Malaria Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
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