Promoting Forgiveness: A Comparison of Two Brief Psychoeducational Group Interventions With a Waiting‐List Control

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103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors studied the effects of 2 brief psychoeducational group interventions on participants' forgiveness for an offender and compared them with a waiting‐list control. The Self‐Enhancement group justified forgiveness because of its physical and psychological benefits to the forgiver. The Interpersonal group justified forgiveness because of its utility in restoring interpersonal relationships. Both groups led to decreased feelings of revenge, increased positive feelings toward the offender, and greater reports of conciliatory behavior. The Self‐Enhancement group also increased affirming attributions toward the offender, decreased feelings of revenge, and increased conciliatory behavior more effectively than did the Interpersonal group. 1995 American Counseling Association

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-68
Number of pages14
JournalCounseling and Values
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Forgiveness
Emotions
Counseling
Psychology
Offenders
Revenge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Religious studies

Cite this

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