Prolactin and its receptor are expressed in murine hair follicle epithelium, show hair cycle-dependent expression, and induce catagen

Kerstin Foitzik, Karoline Krause, Allan J. Nixon, Christine A. Ford, Ulrich Ohnemus, Allan J. Pearson, Ralf Paus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Here, we provide the first study of prolactin (PRL) and prolactin receptor (PRLR) expression during the nonseasonal murine hair cycle, which is, in contrast to sheep, comparable with the human scalp and report that both PRL and PRLR are stringently restricted to the hair follicle epithelium and are strongly hair cycle-dependent. In addition we show that PRL exerts functional effects on anagen hair follicles in murine skin organ culture by down-regulation of proliferation in follicular keratinocytes. In telogen follicles, PRL-like immunoreactivity was detected in outer root sheath (ORS) keratinocytes. During early anagen (III to IV), the developing inner root sheath (IRS) and the surrounding ORS were positive for PRL. In later anagen stages, PRL could be detected in the proximal IRS and the inner layer of the ORS. The regressing (catagen) follicle showed a strong expression of PRL in the proximal ORS. In early anagen, PRLR immunoreactivity occurred in the distal part of the ORS around the developing IRS, and subsequently to a restricted area of the more distal ORS during later anagen stages and during early catagen. The dermal papilla (DP) stayed negative for both PRL and PRLR throughout the cycle. Telogen follicles showed only a very weak PRLR staining of ORS keratinocytes. The long-form PRLR transcript was shown by real-time polymerase chain reaction to be transiently down-regulated during early anagen, whereas PRL transcripts were up-regulated during mid anagen. Addition of PRL (400 ng/ml) to anagen hair follicles in murine skin organ culture for 72 hours induced premature catagen development in vitro along with a decline in the number of proliferating hair bulb keratinocytes. These data support the intriguing concept that PRL is generated locally in the hair follicle epithelium and acts directly in an auto crine or paracrine manner to modulate the hair cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1611-1621
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume162
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Prolactin Receptors
Hair Follicle
Prolactin
Hair
Epithelium
Keratinocytes
Organ Culture Techniques
Skin
Scalp
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sheep
Down-Regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Prolactin and its receptor are expressed in murine hair follicle epithelium, show hair cycle-dependent expression, and induce catagen. / Foitzik, Kerstin; Krause, Karoline; Nixon, Allan J.; Ford, Christine A.; Ohnemus, Ulrich; Pearson, Allan J.; Paus, Ralf.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 162, No. 5, 01.05.2003, p. 1611-1621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foitzik, Kerstin ; Krause, Karoline ; Nixon, Allan J. ; Ford, Christine A. ; Ohnemus, Ulrich ; Pearson, Allan J. ; Paus, Ralf. / Prolactin and its receptor are expressed in murine hair follicle epithelium, show hair cycle-dependent expression, and induce catagen. In: American Journal of Pathology. 2003 ; Vol. 162, No. 5. pp. 1611-1621.
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