Project Stride: An Equine-Assisted Intervention to Reduce Symptoms of Social Anxiety in Young Women

Sarah V. Alfonso, Lauren A. Alfonso, Maria Llabre, M. Isabel Fernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

METHOD: We developed and pilot tested Project Stride, a brief, six-session intervention combining equine-assisted activities and cognitive-behavioral strategies to reduce symptoms of social anxiety. A total of 12 women, 18-29 years of age, were randomly assigned to Project Stride or a no-treatment control. Participants completed the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale at baseline, immediate-post, and 6 weeks after treatment.

INTRODUCTION: Although there is evidence supporting the use of equine-assisted activities to treat mental disorders, its efficacy in reducing signs and symptoms of social anxiety in young women has not been examined.

RESULTS: Project Stride was highly acceptable and feasible. Compared to control participants, those in Project Stride had significantly greater reductions in social anxiety scores from baseline to immediate-post [decrease of 24.8 points; t (9) = 3.40, P = .008)] and from baseline to follow-up [decrease of 31.8 points; t (9) = 4.12, P = .003)].

CONCLUSION: These findings support conducting a full-scale efficacy trial of Project Stride.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-467
Number of pages7
JournalExplore: The Journal of Science and Healing
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Anxiety
Horses
Baseline
Efficacy
Decrease
Mental Disorders
Signs and Symptoms
Disorder
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Equine-assisted activities
  • Social anxiety
  • Theory-based intervention
  • Young women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Project Stride : An Equine-Assisted Intervention to Reduce Symptoms of Social Anxiety in Young Women. / Alfonso, Sarah V.; Alfonso, Lauren A.; Llabre, Maria; Isabel Fernandez, M.

In: Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, Vol. 11, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 461-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alfonso, Sarah V. ; Alfonso, Lauren A. ; Llabre, Maria ; Isabel Fernandez, M. / Project Stride : An Equine-Assisted Intervention to Reduce Symptoms of Social Anxiety in Young Women. In: Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing. 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 461-467.
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