Project enhance

A randomized controlled trial of an individualized HIV prevention intervention for HIV-infected men who have sex with men conducted in a primary care setting

Steven Safren, Conall M. O'Cleirigh, Margie Skeer, Steven A. Elsesser, Kenneth H. Mayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are the largest group of individuals in the U.S. living with HIV and have the greatest number of new infections. This study was designed to test a brief, culturally relevant prevention intervention for HIV-infected MSM, which could be integrated into HIV care. Method: HIV-infected MSM who received HIV care in a community health center (N = 201), and who reported HIV sexual transmission-risk behavior (TRB) in the prior 6 months, were randomized to receive the intervention or treatment as usual. The intervention, provided by a medical social worker, included proactive case management for psychosocial problems, counseling about living with HIV, and HIV TRB risk reduction. Participants were followed every 3 months for one year. Results: Participants, regardless of study condition, reported reductions in HIV TRB, with no significant differential effect by condition in primary intent-to-treat analyses. When examining moderators, the intervention was differentially effective in reducing HIV TRB for those who screened in for baseline depression, but this was not the case for those who did not screen in for depression. Conclusions: The similar level of reduction in HIV TRB in the intervention and control groups, consistent with other recent secondary prevention interventions, speaks to the need for new, creative designs, or more potent interventions in secondary HIV prevention trials, as the control group seemed to benefit from risk assessment, study contact, and referrals provided by study staff. The differential finding for those with depression may suggest that those without depression could reap benefits from limited interventions, but those with a comorbid psychiatric diagnosis may require additional interventions to modify their sexual risk behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-179
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
HIV
Risk-Taking
Depression
Secondary Prevention
Community Health Centers
Control Groups
Case Management
Risk Reduction Behavior
Mental Disorders
Sexual Behavior
Counseling
Referral and Consultation
Infection

Keywords

  • AIDS/HIV
  • Depression
  • High-risk sexual behavior
  • HIV prevention
  • MSM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Project enhance : A randomized controlled trial of an individualized HIV prevention intervention for HIV-infected men who have sex with men conducted in a primary care setting. / Safren, Steven; O'Cleirigh, Conall M.; Skeer, Margie; Elsesser, Steven A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2013, p. 171-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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