Progressive cytomegalovirus encephalopathy following congenital infection in an infant with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

Richard G. Curless, Gwendolyn B Scott, M. Judith Post, Jocelyn B. Gregorios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Congenital central nervous system infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) usually results in a nonprogressive encephalopathy. Ninety percent of patients with clinically apparent infections at birth have a permanent neurological disability. It has been suggested that some infants may have persistent infection manifested by progressive encephalopathy during infancy. In the present case, clinical and pathological findings suggest the reactivation of a prior intrauterine CMV infection in a child with human T-lymphotrophic virus type III (HTLV-III) infection. The presence of HTLV-III may have reduced the immune surveillance of this infant, allowing the CMV to reactivate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-257
Number of pages3
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1987

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Brain Diseases
Cytomegalovirus
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Central Nervous System Infections
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Virus Diseases
Infection
Parturition
Viruses

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Congenital infection
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Encephalopathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Progressive cytomegalovirus encephalopathy following congenital infection in an infant with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. / Curless, Richard G.; Scott, Gwendolyn B; Judith Post, M.; Gregorios, Jocelyn B.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.10.1987, p. 255-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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