Prodromal symptoms before onset of manic-depressive disorder suggested by first hospital admission histories

Janice A. Egeland, Abram M. Hostetter, David L. Pauls, James N. Sussex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: A priority for research on manic-depressive or bipolar I disorder (BPI) for children and adolescents has been to search for early predictors of the illness. Method: Medical record data were reviewed and systematically coded for a sample of 58 adult patients (32 males/26 females) with confirmed diagnoses of BPI to identify prodromal features and possible patterns of symptoms from the Amish Study. Results: The most frequently reported symptoms included episodic changes in mood (depressed and irritable) and energy plus anger dyscontrol, with no significant gender differences. A progression of ages is seen for the most commonly reported symptoms prior to age 16. The time interval was 9 to 12 years between appearance of the first symptoms and onset of a documented BPI syndrome. Conclusions: The data suggest testable hypotheses about specific symptoms and behaviors that may be useful for the early detection of children at highest risk for developing manic-depressive disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1245-1252
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Prodromal symptoms/behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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