Procedural and interpretive skills of medical students: experiences and attitudes of fourth-year students.

Edward H. Wu, D. Michael Elnicki, Eric J. Alper, James E. Bost, Eugene C. Corbett, Mark J. Fagan, Alex Mechaber, Paul E. Ogden, James L. Sebastian, Dario M. Torre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recent data do not exist regarding fourth-year medical students' performance of and attitudes toward procedural and interpretive skills, and how these differ from third-year students'. METHOD: Cross-sectional survey conducted in February 2006 of 122 fourth-year students from seven U.S. medical schools, compared with their responses in summer 2005. Students estimated their cumulative performance of 22 skills and reported self-confidence and perceived importance using a five-point Likert-type scale. RESULTS: The response rate was 79% (96/122). A majority reported never having performed cardioversion, thoracentesis, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, blood culture, purified protein derivative placement, or paracentesis. One fifth of students had never performed peripheral intravenous catheter insertion, phlebotomy, or arterial blood sampling. Students reported increased cumulative performance of 17 skills, increased self-confidence in five skills, and decreased perceived importance in three skills (two-sided P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: A majority of fourth-year medical students still have never performed important procedures, and a substantial minority have not performed basic procedures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAcademic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Volume83
Issue number10 Suppl
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Medical Students
medical student
Students
self-confidence
experience
student
performance
Paracentesis
Electric Countershock
Phlebotomy
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Medical Schools
Catheters
Cross-Sectional Studies
minority
school
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wu, E. H., Elnicki, D. M., Alper, E. J., Bost, J. E., Corbett, E. C., Fagan, M. J., ... Torre, D. M. (2008). Procedural and interpretive skills of medical students: experiences and attitudes of fourth-year students. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 83(10 Suppl).

Procedural and interpretive skills of medical students : experiences and attitudes of fourth-year students. / Wu, Edward H.; Elnicki, D. Michael; Alper, Eric J.; Bost, James E.; Corbett, Eugene C.; Fagan, Mark J.; Mechaber, Alex; Ogden, Paul E.; Sebastian, James L.; Torre, Dario M.

In: Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, Vol. 83, No. 10 Suppl, 01.10.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, EH, Elnicki, DM, Alper, EJ, Bost, JE, Corbett, EC, Fagan, MJ, Mechaber, A, Ogden, PE, Sebastian, JL & Torre, DM 2008, 'Procedural and interpretive skills of medical students: experiences and attitudes of fourth-year students.', Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, vol. 83, no. 10 Suppl.
Wu, Edward H. ; Elnicki, D. Michael ; Alper, Eric J. ; Bost, James E. ; Corbett, Eugene C. ; Fagan, Mark J. ; Mechaber, Alex ; Ogden, Paul E. ; Sebastian, James L. ; Torre, Dario M. / Procedural and interpretive skills of medical students : experiences and attitudes of fourth-year students. In: Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges. 2008 ; Vol. 83, No. 10 Suppl.
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