Prevalence of usual-corrected binocular distance visual acuity impairment in Hispanic and non-Hispanic adults

Byron L. Lam, David J. Lee, Orlando Gómez-Marín

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to perform comparative analyses of the population-based prevalence of usual-corrected binocular distance visual acuity impairment among Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the United States. METHODS. Data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES), 1982-1984, and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Augmentation Survey I (NHANES I-A), 1974-1975, were analyzed to investigate the epidemiology of usual-corrected binocular distance acuity in adults 25 to 74 years of age among Cuban-Americans (N = 396), Mexican-Americans (N = 1381), Puerto Ricans (N = 513), African-Americans (N = 250), and non-Hispanic white Americans (N = 2660). Binocular distance acuity was assessed using Sloan Letters or Landolt Rings with the participants wearing their corrective lenses, if any. RESULTS. Prevalences of 20/50 or worse usual-corrected binocular distance acuity were 3.5%, 4.6%, and 6.6% for Cuban-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Puerto Ricans, respectively, in the HHANES; and 7.7% and 4.1% for African-Americans and non-Hispanic whites, respectively, in the NHANES I-A. Within the HHANES, after adjustment for gender and age, Puerto Rican adults were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of visual impairment (20/50 or worse) and were significantly less likely to become unimpaired with usual correction than Cuban-American adults. Within the NHANES I-A, African-Americans were found to have a higher prevalence of visual impairment (20/50 or worse) and were significantly less likely to become unimpaired with usual correction than non-Hispanic whites. Higher prevalences of visual impairment (20/50 or worse) were associated with increasing age for all ethnic groups. After controlling for age, odds of usual-corrected visual impairment (20/50 or worse) were significantly higher in women than in men for Cuban-Americans and Mexican-Americans (odds ratios: 4.5 and 2.6, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. The results from this study suggest that compared to other Hispanic groups and non-Hispanic whites, Puerto Rican and African-American adults may not be receiving similar eye care services and/or may have more severe eye diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-83
Number of pages11
JournalOphthalmic Epidemiology
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • Hispanics
  • Population-based study
  • Visual acuity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Epidemiology

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