Prevalence of Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Symptomatology Among HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men in HIV Primary Care

Conall O'Cleirigh, Jessica F. Magidson, Margie R. Skeer, Kenneth H. Mayer, Steven Safren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The presence of psychiatric symptoms in gay/bisexual men managing HIV are underidentified and undertreated and can interfere with optimal HIV disease management. There is a paucity of prevalence reports of these symptoms in this group, identified in the primary HIV care setting. Few studies have compared prevalence rates based on empirically supported screening tools in relation to diagnoses made in primary care. Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and substance abuse in HIV-infected gay/bisexual men and to estimate the proportion of those who had been diagnosed within their primary medical care setting. Method: Participants (n = 503) were HIV-infected gay/bisexual men screened for participation in a HIV prevention trial and completed psychosocial assessment. Data were also extracted from patients' electronic medical record. Results: More than 47% of participants met diagnostic screen-in criteria for any anxiety disorder, of whom approximately one-third were identified in primary care. More than 22% screened in for a depressive mood disorder, approximately 50% of whom had been identified in primary care. A quarter of the sample had elevated substance abuse symptoms, 19.4% of whom were identified in primary care. Of those with symptoms of alcohol abuse (19.9%), 9.0% of those were identified in primary care. Conclusion: These results provide some evidence suggesting that mood, anxiety, and substance abuse symptomatology are prevalent among HIV-infected gay/bisexual men and are underidentified in primary care. Increased mental health and substance use screening integrated into HIV primary care treatment settings may help to identify more gay/bisexual men in need of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)470-478
Number of pages9
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Substance-Related Disorders
Psychiatry
Primary Health Care
HIV
Sexual Minorities
Primary Care
Bisexual
AIDS/HIV
Substance Abuse
Electronic Health Records
Depressive Disorder
Disease Management
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders
Alcoholism
Mental Health
Anxiety
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Prevalence of Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Symptomatology Among HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men in HIV Primary Care. / O'Cleirigh, Conall; Magidson, Jessica F.; Skeer, Margie R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Safren, Steven.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 56, No. 5, 01.09.2015, p. 470-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Cleirigh, Conall ; Magidson, Jessica F. ; Skeer, Margie R. ; Mayer, Kenneth H. ; Safren, Steven. / Prevalence of Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Symptomatology Among HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men in HIV Primary Care. In: Psychosomatics. 2015 ; Vol. 56, No. 5. pp. 470-478.
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