Prevalence of Low Cardiovascular Risk Profile Among Diverse Hispanic/Latino Adults in the United States by Age, Sex, and Level of Acculturation: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Martha L. Daviglus, Amber Pirzada, Ramon Durazo-Arvizu, Jinsong Chen, Matthew Allison, Larissa Avilés-Santa, Jianwen Cai, Hector M. González, Robert C. Kaplan, Neil Schneiderman, Paul D. Sorlie, Gregory A. Talavera, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Jeremiah Stamler

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Abstract

Background: Favorable levels of all readily measurable major cardiovascular disease risk factors (ie, low risk [LR]) are associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Data are not available on LR prevalence among Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse ethnic backgrounds. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of a low cardiovascular disease risk profile among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States and to examine cross-sectional associations of LR with measures of acculturation. Methods and Results: The multicenter, prospective, population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos examined 16 415 men and women aged 18 to 74 years at baseline (2008-2011) with diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. Analyses involved 14 757 adults (mean age 41.3 years; 60.6% women). LR was defined using national guidelines for favorable levels of serum cholesterol, blood pressure, and body mass index and by not having diabetes mellitus and not currently smoking. Age-adjusted LR prevalence was low (8.4% overall; 5.1% for men, 11.2% for women) and varied by background (4.2% in men of Mexican heritage versus 15.0% in women of Cuban heritage). Lower acculturation (assessed using proxy measures) was significantly associated with higher odds of a LR profile among women only: Age-adjusted odds ratios of having LR were 1.64 (95% CI 1.24-2.17) for foreign-born versus US-born women and 1.96 (95% CI 1.49-2.58) for women residing in the United States <10 versus ≥10 years. Conclusions: Among diverse US Hispanic/Latino adults, the prevalence of a LR profile is low. Lower acculturation is associated with higher odds of a LR profile among women but not men. Comprehensive public health strategies are needed to improve the cardiovascular health of US Hispanic/Latino adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere003929
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016

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Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease prevention
  • Cardiovascular disease risk factors
  • Low risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Daviglus, M. L., Pirzada, A., Durazo-Arvizu, R., Chen, J., Allison, M., Avilés-Santa, L., Cai, J., González, H. M., Kaplan, R. C., Schneiderman, N., Sorlie, P. D., Talavera, G. A., Wassertheil-Smoller, S., & Stamler, J. (2016). Prevalence of Low Cardiovascular Risk Profile Among Diverse Hispanic/Latino Adults in the United States by Age, Sex, and Level of Acculturation: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Journal of the American Heart Association, 5(8), [e003929]. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.116.003929