Prevalence comparisons of somatic and psychiatric symptoms between community nonpatients without pain, acute pain patients, and chronic pain patients

David A Fishbain, Jinrun Gao, John E Lewis, Daniel Bruns, Laura J. Meyer, John Mark Disorbio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Somatic/psychiatric symptoms are frequently found in chronic pain patients (CPPs). The objectives of this study were to determine 1) which somatic/psychiatric symptoms are more commonly found in acute pain patients (APPs) and CPPs vs community nonpatients without pain (CNPWPs) and 2) if somatic/psychiatric symptom prevalence differs between APPs and CPPs. Design: The above groups were compared statistically for endorsement of 15 symptoms: fatigue, numbness/tingling, dizziness, difficulty opening/closing mouth, muscle weakness, difficulty staying asleep, depression, muscle tightness, nervousness, irritability, memory, falling, nausea, concentration, and headaches. Results: After controlling for age, gender, and level of pain, APPs and CPPs had a statistically significantly greater prevalence (at a P<0.01 level) for 11 and 13 symptoms, respectively, vs CNPWPs. After controlling for age, gender, and level of pain, CPPs had a statistically significantly greater prevalence (at a P<0.01 level) for eight symptoms vs APPs. Symptoms were highly correlated in both APPs and CPPs. Conclusions: CPPs are characterized to a significantly greater extent than comparison groups by somatic/psychiatric symptoms that are highly intercorrelated. This has implications for clinical practice and future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-50
Number of pages14
JournalPain Medicine (United States)
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Acute Pain
Chronic Pain
Psychiatry
Pain
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Accidental Falls
Muscle Tonus
Hypesthesia
Muscle Weakness
Dizziness
Nausea
Fatigue
Headache
Mouth
Anxiety
Depression

Keywords

  • Acute pain patients
  • Chronic pain patients
  • Community patients without pain
  • Comorbid symptoms
  • Comorbidity
  • Prevalence
  • Somatic symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Prevalence comparisons of somatic and psychiatric symptoms between community nonpatients without pain, acute pain patients, and chronic pain patients. / Fishbain, David A; Gao, Jinrun; Lewis, John E; Bruns, Daniel; Meyer, Laura J.; Disorbio, John Mark.

In: Pain Medicine (United States), Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 37-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fishbain, David A ; Gao, Jinrun ; Lewis, John E ; Bruns, Daniel ; Meyer, Laura J. ; Disorbio, John Mark. / Prevalence comparisons of somatic and psychiatric symptoms between community nonpatients without pain, acute pain patients, and chronic pain patients. In: Pain Medicine (United States). 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 37-50.
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