Presurgical levels of circulating cell-derived microparticles discriminate between patients with and without transfusion in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Wenche Jy, Orlando W Gomez-Marin, Tomas Salerno, Anthony L. Panos, Donald Williams, Lawrence L. Horstman, Yeon Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Improved understanding of presurgical risk factors for transfusions will lead to reduction in their number and related complications. The goal of this study is to identify these factors in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: Presented herein are results of analyses of data from an ongoing study of transfusion in CABG surgery. Of 122 patients, 81 received transfusion (Tx) and 41 did not (NoTx). In addition to routine tests, presurgical levels of microparticles from platelets (PMPs), red cells (RMPs), and other lineages were assayed. Results: The Tx and NoTx groups were similar with respect to most presurgical variables but differed in distribution of gender, blood type, diabetes prevalence, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), hemoglobin (HGB), and microparticle levels. Stepwise multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate presurgical variables and to develop a model to assess risk factors for transfusion. CD41+ PMP and CD235+ RMP levels were found to be the main risk factors for transfusion. The Model's discriminating ability was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, which showed that the area under the model curve (± standard error) was 0.86 ± 0.04 (95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.94). According to the model, patients with higher presurgical levels of circulating CD41+ PMP, CD235a+ RMP, and HGB, as well as a shorter aPTT, are less likely to receive transfusion(s). Conclusions: Presurgical levels of CD41+ PMPs and CD235a+ RMPs are the main risk factors for transfusion in CABG, followed by HGB and aPTT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-311
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume149
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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