Preserved cochlear CISS signal is a predictor for hearing preservation in patients treated for vestibular schwannoma with stereotactic radiosurgery

Vinay Prabhu, Douglas Kondziolka, Travis C. Hill, Carolina G. Benjamin, Matthew S. Shinseki, John G. Golfinos, J. Thomas Roland, Girish M. Fatterpekar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Hearing preservation is a goal for many patients with vestibular schwannoma. We examined pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and posttreatment hearing outcome after stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: From 2004 to 2014, a cohort of 125 consecutive patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated via stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were retrospectively reviewed. MRIs containing three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state or equivalent within 1 year before treatment were classified by two radiologists for pretreatment characteristics. "Good" hearing was defined as American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery class A. Poor hearing outcome was defined as loss of good pretreatment hearing after stereotactic radiosurgery. Results: Sixty-one patients met criteria for inclusion. Most had tumors in the distal internal auditory canal (55%), separated from the brainstem (63%), oval shape (64%) without cysts (86%), and median volume of 0.85 ± 0.55 cm 3. Pretreatment audiograms were performed a median of 108 ± 173 days before stereotactic radiosurgery; 38% had good pretreatment hearing. Smaller tumor volume (p < 0.005) was the only variable associated with good pretreatment hearing. 49 (80%) patients had posttreatment audiometry, with median follow-up of 197 ± 247 days. Asymmetrically decreased pretreatment cochlear CISS signal on the side of the VS was the only variable associated with poor hearing outcome (p = 0.001). Inter-rater agreement on cochlear three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state preservation was 91%. Conclusions: Decreased cochlear CISS signal may indicate a tumor's association with the cochlear neurovascular bundle, influencing endolymph protein concentration and creating an inability to preserve hearing. This important MRI characteristic can influence planning, counseling, and patient selection for vestibular schwannoma treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-631
Number of pages4
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hearing outcome
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery
  • Vestibular schwannoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

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