Prepartum, postpartum and chronic depression effects on neonatal behavior

Miguel A Diego, Tiffany M Field, Maria Hernandez-Reif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eighty pregnant women were assessed for depression during mid-pregnancy (Mean gestational age = 25.9 weeks) and shortly after delivery in order to assess the effects of the onset and chronicity of maternal depression on neonatal behavior. The women were classified as reporting depressive symptoms: (1) only during the prepartum assessment; (2) only during the postpartum assessment; (3) during both the prepartum and postpartum assessments; or (4) reporting no depressive symptoms at either the prepartum or the postpartum assessment. Neonates born to mothers reporting symptoms of depression at any time point exhibited greater indeterminate sleep than neonates of non-depressed mothers. Neonates born to mothers reporting prenatal depression spent more time fussing and crying and exhibited more stress behaviors than neonates born to non-depressed mothers or neonates born to mothers exhibiting symptoms of depression only during the postpartum assessment. Finally, neonates born to mothers exhibiting symptoms of depression during both the prepartum and postpartum assessments exhibited less optimal Brazelton neurobehavioral assessment scores than neonates of non-depressed mothers or neonates born to mothers who exhibited symptoms of depression during only the prepartum or only during the postpartum assessments. Taken together these findings suggest that neonatal behavior is influenced not just by the presence but also by the timing and duration of maternal depression symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-164
Number of pages10
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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Postpartum Depression
Mothers
Depression
Newborn Infant
Postpartum Period
Crying
Gestational Age
Pregnant Women
Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Prepartum, postpartum and chronic depression effects on neonatal behavior. / Diego, Miguel A; Field, Tiffany M; Hernandez-Reif, Maria.

In: Infant Behavior and Development, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.06.2005, p. 155-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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