Predictors of treatment outcome for the unified protocol for transdiagnostic treatment of emotional disorders in children (UP-C)

Sarah M. Kennedy, Niza A. Tonarely, Jamie A. Sherman, Jill Ehrenreich May

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Various efficacious treatment packages exist for youth anxiety, and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is now considered to be a well-established treatment for child anxiety disorders (Higa-McMillan, Francis, Rith-Najarian, & Chorpita, 2016). Improving outcomes for the significant proportion of anxious youth who demonstrate inadequate response to CBT is imperative, but our understanding of who does and does not benefit is incomplete. Further, there are no known empirical studies of predictors of treatment response for youth who receive a transdiagnostic intervention for anxiety or depression, and it is therefore unclear whether predictors of response to a transdiagnostic treatment for children are similar to those found in previous studies of anxiety-specific treatments. This study investigated potential predictors of outcome following administration of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders in Children (UP-C; Ehrenreich-May et al., 2018). Participants were 60 children ages 6–13 (M = 9.47, SD = 1.68) with a primary anxiety diagnosis (with or without comorbid depression) who received a 15-week UP-C group treatment. Consistent with prior literature on CBT for anxiety, social anxiety emerged as a consistent predictor of poorer response to the UP-C. Inconsistent with prior literature, depression, symptom severity, parent psychopathology, and child age were not significant predictors of poor outcome. Results indicate some differences between predictors for transdiagnostic versus anxiety-focused treatments, but point to a need for both types of interventions to better target social anxiety in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Clinical Protocols
Anxiety
Cognitive Therapy
Depression
Therapeutics
Anxiety Disorders
Psychopathology

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Child
  • Intervention
  • Predictor
  • Transdiagnostic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Predictors of treatment outcome for the unified protocol for transdiagnostic treatment of emotional disorders in children (UP-C). / Kennedy, Sarah M.; Tonarely, Niza A.; Sherman, Jamie A.; Ehrenreich May, Jill.

In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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