Predictors of home death in palliative care cancer patients

G. Patricia Cantwell, Sally Turco, Carleen Brenneis, John Hanson, Catherine M. Neumann, Eduardo Bruera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With recent changes in health care there is greater emphasis on providing care at home, including the support of families to enable more home deaths. Since a home death may not be practical or desirable in every family situation, there is a need for an objective way to assess the viability of a home death in each individual family situation. The purpose of this study was to describe the relative role of predictors of home death in a cohort of palliative care patients with advanced cancer. A questionnaire was created as a means of assessing the viability of a home death. Five questions were included. Ninety questionnaires were administered by home care coordinators. A follow-up questionnaire was administered to record the place of death. Of the 73 evaluable patients, 34 (47%) died at home and 39 (53%) died in hospital or hospice. The desire for a home death by both the patient and the caregiver, support of a family physician, and presence of more than one caregiver were all significantly associated with a home death. Logistic regression identified a desire for home death by both the patient and the caregiver as the main predictive factor for a home death. The presence of more than one caregiver was also predictive of home death. The questionnaire is simple and, if our results are confirmed, it can be used for predicting those who will not have a home death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Palliative Care
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Palliative Care
cancer
death
Neoplasms
Caregivers
caregiver
family situation
questionnaire
Home Care Services
Hospices
Death Certificates
family physician
Family Physicians
hospice
home care
patient care
Logistic Models
logistics
Delivery of Health Care
health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Patricia Cantwell, G., Turco, S., Brenneis, C., Hanson, J., Neumann, C. M., & Bruera, E. (2000). Predictors of home death in palliative care cancer patients. Journal of Palliative Care, 16(1), 23-28.

Predictors of home death in palliative care cancer patients. / Patricia Cantwell, G.; Turco, Sally; Brenneis, Carleen; Hanson, John; Neumann, Catherine M.; Bruera, Eduardo.

In: Journal of Palliative Care, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.03.2000, p. 23-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patricia Cantwell, G, Turco, S, Brenneis, C, Hanson, J, Neumann, CM & Bruera, E 2000, 'Predictors of home death in palliative care cancer patients', Journal of Palliative Care, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 23-28.
Patricia Cantwell G, Turco S, Brenneis C, Hanson J, Neumann CM, Bruera E. Predictors of home death in palliative care cancer patients. Journal of Palliative Care. 2000 Mar 1;16(1):23-28.
Patricia Cantwell, G. ; Turco, Sally ; Brenneis, Carleen ; Hanson, John ; Neumann, Catherine M. ; Bruera, Eduardo. / Predictors of home death in palliative care cancer patients. In: Journal of Palliative Care. 2000 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 23-28.
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