Predictors of adolescents' health-promoting behaviors guided by primary socialization theory

Lynn Rew, Kristopher Arheart, Sanna Thompson, Karen Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of parents and peers on adolescents' health-promoting behaviors, framed by primary socialization theory. Design and Method: Longitudinal data collected annually from 1,081 rural youth (mean age = 17 ± 0.7; 43.5% males; 44% Hispanic) and once from their parents were analyzed using generalized linear models. Results: Parental monitoring and adolescent's religious commitment significantly predicted all health-promoting behaviors (nutrition, physical activity, safety, health practices awareness, and stress management). Other statistically significant predictors were parent's responsiveness and health-promoting behaviors. Peer influence predicted safety and stress management. Practice Implications: Nurses may facilitate adolescents' development of health-promoting behaviors through family-focused interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-288
Number of pages12
JournalJournal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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Socialization
Parents
Health
Adolescent Development
Safety Management
Hispanic Americans
Linear Models
Nurses
Exercise
Safety
Adolescent Health
Peer Influence

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Health behaviors
  • Health promotion
  • Parental monitoring
  • Primary socialization
  • Religiosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Predictors of adolescents' health-promoting behaviors guided by primary socialization theory. / Rew, Lynn; Arheart, Kristopher; Thompson, Sanna; Johnson, Karen.

In: Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.10.2013, p. 277-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rew, Lynn ; Arheart, Kristopher ; Thompson, Sanna ; Johnson, Karen. / Predictors of adolescents' health-promoting behaviors guided by primary socialization theory. In: Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing. 2013 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 277-288.
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