Prediction of treatment response at 5-year follow-up in a randomized clinical trial of behaviorally based couple therapies

Brian R. Baucom, David C. Atkins, Lorelei Simpson Rowe, Brian Doss, Andrew Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Building on earlier work examining predictors of short- and moderate-term treatment response, demographic, intrapersonal, communication, and interpersonal variables were examined as predictors of clinically significant outcomes 5 years after couples completed 1 of 2 behaviorally based couple therapies. Method: One hundred and thirty-four couples were randomly assigned to Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT; Jacobson & Christensen, 1998) or Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) and followed for 5 years after treatment. Outcomes include clinically significant change categories of relationship satisfaction and marital status at 5-year follow-up. Optimal subsets of predictors were selected using an automated, bootstrapped selection procedure based on Bayesian information criterion. Results: Higher levels of commitment and being married for a longer period of time were associated with decreased likelihood of divorce or separation (odds ratio [OR]=1.39, p=.004; OR=0.91, p=.015). Being married for a longer period of time was also associated with increased likelihood of positive, clinically significant change (OR = 1.12, p = .029). Finally, higher levels of wife-desired closeness were associated with increased odds of positive, clinically significant change and decreased odds of divorce for moderately distressed, IBCT couples (OR = 1.16, p = .002; OR - 0.85, p = .007, respectively), whereas the opposite was true for moderately distressed, TBCT couples (OR = 0.77, p <.001; OR = 1.17, p = .002, respectively). Conclusions: Commitment-related variables are associated with clinically significant outcomes at 5-year follow-up as well as at termination and moderate-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-114
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Couples Therapy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Odds Ratio
Divorce
Therapeutics
Marital Status
Clinical Trials
Prediction
Therapy
Spouses
Communication
Demography

Keywords

  • Clinically significant change
  • Couple therapy
  • Long-term response
  • Prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Prediction of treatment response at 5-year follow-up in a randomized clinical trial of behaviorally based couple therapies. / Baucom, Brian R.; Atkins, David C.; Rowe, Lorelei Simpson; Doss, Brian; Christensen, Andrew.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 83, No. 1, 2015, p. 103-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baucom, Brian R. ; Atkins, David C. ; Rowe, Lorelei Simpson ; Doss, Brian ; Christensen, Andrew. / Prediction of treatment response at 5-year follow-up in a randomized clinical trial of behaviorally based couple therapies. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 83, No. 1. pp. 103-114.
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